Listening Room: Historic Live Performances from the Met

Saturday, June 04, 2011

Experiencing the Met's radio broadcasts is no longer an ephemeral experience, writes blogger Fred Plotkin on WQX-Aria. The Met, along with Sony, has begun to take some jewels out of the vault, including recordings of Mozart, Beethoven and Wagner operas.

Read More

Comments [13]

Opera Feroce Concocts a Pastry-Like Pasticcio

Friday, June 03, 2011

WQX-Aria blogger Olivia Giovetti takes a look at Opera Feroce's upcoming production of Amor & Psyche, operatic pasticcio and entrepreneurial singers.

Read More

Comment

Two Unsung Singers: Anna Caterina Antonacci and Daniela Barcellona

Thursday, June 02, 2011

At the moment, there are few top Italian female singers known to international audiences, writes Fred Plotkin on WQX-Aria. But two getting fresh attention and are well worth hearing: Anna Caterina Antonacci and Daniela Barcellona.

Read More

Comments [2]

In Memoriam: Giorgio Tozzi

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

As the news of death of the great bass Giorgio Tozzi (January 8, 1923-May 30, 2011) has begun to spread, a few people have asked, “Where in Italy was he from?” The answer was Chicago, writes Fred Plotkin on WQX-Aria.

Read More

Comments [15]

Opera's Great Upheaval, Part II

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

With the Guggenheim's "Great Upheaval" drawing to a close, WQX-Aria blogger Olivia Giovetti examines opera during World War I in the second half of this two-part series.

Read More

Comments [1]

Opera's Great Upheaval, Part I

Saturday, May 28, 2011

As the Guggenheim Museum's illuminating exhibition, "The Great Upheaval," comes to a close, WQX-Aria blogger Olivia Giovetti considers the parallels between opera and art circa World War I in a two-part series.

Read More

Comments [2]

Four Essential (and Local!) Summer Festivals

Friday, May 27, 2011

Want to go out of town or keep it local? Do you crave fully-staged Strauss or Mozart with a single piano and seven singers? Olivia Giovetti breaks it all down in this guide to New York-area summer opera performances.

Read More

Comments [1]

Fifteen Essential European Opera Festivals

Thursday, May 26, 2011

There are the famous, evergreen festivals including Bayreuth, Edinburgh, Glyndebourne, Salzburg, and Verona. All are great and deserve to be attended at least once. But there is so much more, in big cities and small towns.

Read More

Comments [4]

To Be a Good Singer, It Helps to Be a 'Lissner'

Thursday, May 26, 2011

"There are still great voices today, but they might reside in bodies that look more like those of the average person rather than an operatic Angelina Jolie or Brad Pitt," writes blogger Fred Plotkin. "I have seen many pretty or handsome singers who bore me silly."

Read More

Comments [2]

Francesca Zambello to Join Washington National Opera

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

With her inaugural season at the helm of the Glimmerglass Festival less than six weeks away, director Francesca Zambello has been appointed artistic adviser to the Washington National Opera.

Read More

Comments [3]

Say Yes to the Dress

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

With the new and operatic Yves Saint-Laurent documentary now in cinemas, WQX-Aria blogger Olivia Giovetti turns a sartorial eye to the bridge between high fashion and opera.

Read More

Comments [2]

Keeping it Real: Teatro Grattacielo Rescues Forgotten Verismo Operas

Monday, May 23, 2011

In my post about operatic Genoa, I made passing reference to the grattacielo (skyscraper) there that contained a 1000-seat cinema where opera was presented from after World War II until 1992. Among the many artists who sang there were Renata Tebaldi and Maria Callas. This building is usually called the first skyscraper in Italy, a nation that still has very few buildings that merit this designation. This one, and the Pirelli Tower in Milan, are my favorites.

Read More

Comments [2]

Is That All There Is?

Saturday, May 21, 2011

All of this talk of rapture and apocalypse has reminded blogger Fred Plotkin of what is known in German opera as the Schlussszene: a great dramatic closing scene that only a word with three consecutive S's could convey. Do you have a favorite closing scene in opera?

Read More

Comments [11]

New York City Opera Seeks a New Home

Saturday, May 21, 2011

With NYCO's future outside of Lincoln Center a sure thing, WQX-Aria blogger Olivia Giovetti considers the immediate reaction to the late-breaking news.

Read More

Comments [10]

A Young Lady's First Time and an Old Dame's Last Hurrah

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

On WQX-Aria, Olivia Giovetti recalls her introduction to opera following Tuesday night's celebration of Joan Sutherland at the Town Hall.

Read More

Comments [4]

A Mahler Opera? Not Such a Stretch, Actually

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Gustav Mahler, who died a century ago today, was a New Yorker for the last three years of his life, and during this time he led several productions at the Met. On WQX-Aria, Fred Plotkin reflects on the composer's life, and why it may be perfect operatic fodder.

Read More

Comments [7]

What’s So Special about Gilbert and Sullivan? Or We’ve Got a Little List...

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

With the first-ever Gilbert and Sullivan sing-along taking place at Symphony Space and Caramoor kicking off its summer season with H.M.S. Pinafore, Naomi Lewin and Midge Woolsey talk about the timeless charm of the dynamic operetta duo.

Read More

Comments [30]

Could New York City Opera Benefit from a Change of Scene?

Monday, May 16, 2011

After a weekend of new works at the VOX festival and a reaffirmation of their edgy artistic vision, could New York City Opera solve its problems with a move to a new venue and a commitment to the new and experimental? Blogger Olivia Giovetti considers this on WQX-Aria.

Read More

Comments [9]

Other Stages: The Little Opera Theatre of New York Presents a Mozart Premiere

Monday, May 16, 2011

There has not been a new Mozart opera at the Met since 1984. But as WQX-Aria blogger Fred Plotkin explains, the composer's nearly forgotten gem, Mitridate, Re di Ponto, is finally getting some renewed consideration.

Read More

Comments [1]

Christopher Cerrone's Invisible Cities Gains Visibility This Weekend

Friday, May 13, 2011

As the familiar chestnut goes, music is the universal language. Perhaps this is why composers are drawn to Italo Calvino’s 1972 masterwork, Invisible Cities—a novel that centers on a conversation between Marco Polo and Kublai Khan. Since the explorer and emperor do not speak the same language and are forced to communicate through gestures and faith in one another’s interpretation.

Read More

Comment