Alexandre Lunsqui

Alexandre Lunsqui was born in Brazil and now lives in New York City. After studying engineering and music at University of Campinas, he pursued postgraduate studies in composition at University of Iowa, Columbia University, and IRCAM (year-long cursus of composition and computer music).

His main music teachers were Tristan Murail, Fred Lerdahl and Jeremy Dale-Roberts. His music background also includes brazilian music, jazz and contemporary improvisation. He has participated in Festivals such as Gaudeamus Music Week, Darmstadt, Manca, CrossDrumming, Aspekte, Time of Music, Musica Nova, Beijing Modern, Music at the Anthology, Creative Music Festival, PASIC, and Resonances. His pieces have been played in Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Costa Rica, China, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland, and around the US, by ensembles such as the Ensemble Aleph, Arditti String Quartet, Argento Chamber Ensemble, Ensemble Piano Possibile, Due East, Ensemble counter)induction, Manhattan Sinfonietta, Nieuw Ensemble, Talea Ensemble, MATA microorchestra, International Contemporary Ensemble, Timetable Percussion, among others. In 2003, he was awarded the Virtuose Prize by the Ministry of Culture of Brazil. He has received prizes from the Percussion Arts Society, Petrobras Cultural, and the Salvatore Martirano Composition Competition. Recent highlights include the French and Japanese premieres of Ligare (with Olivier Maurel and Ayako Okubo), three Irish premieres of the Topografia cycle, and the world premiere of Entresons.Recreo at PASIC (with Greg Beyer and the NIU Percussion Ensemble), plus performances by the Nieuw Ensemble (Amsterdam), Ensemble L'arsenale (Treviso), Talea Ensemble (NYC), and Loadbang Ensemble (NYC). A monographic CD with his chamber was released in Spring 2008. His music has been recorded by Gravina, Usk, Metronome and Carrier labels. He has received a Fromm Commission from the Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard University (2009-2010). (www.lunsqui.com)

Alexandre Lunsqui appears in the following:

'Never Finished, Only Abandoned'

Saturday, December 24, 2011

A few days ago, the New York Philharmonic gave the world premiere of my piece Fibers, Yarn and Wire. Before I go into the details, I’d like to say that I could not be happier with the performances. I cannot fully describe the intensity of watching and listening to those musicians playing my piece. It was a profound experience.

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On Signatures, Broken Rhythms and Mutes

Thursday, December 15, 2011

I began to write this post only a few minutes after the first rehearsal of my work Fibers, Yarn and Wire with the New York Philharmonic, under the auspices of maestro Alan Gilbert. The rehearsals are taking place in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium at the Metropolitan Museum.

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Meet Composer Alexandre Lunsqui

Monday, December 12, 2011

In anticipation of the world premiere of Alexandre Lunsqui's New York Philharmonic-commissioned Fibers, Yarn and Wire this Friday, December 16 and Saturday, December 17 at the Metropolitan Museum and Symphony Space, respectively, Q2 Music presents an exclusive chance to get to know the composer behind this season's NY Phil CONTACT! new-music series. 

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Alexandre Lunsqui

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Drawings for Iberê was inspired by a series of paintings called Spools, by Brazilian painter Iberê Camargo (1914-1994). These works depict numerous images of spools, which occupy an important part of the painter’s childhood memories. The paintings range fromfigurativism to abstractionism, exploring a wide range of visual and psychological configurations. In Drawings for Iberê, the kinetic elements present in most of the abstract paintings of the series are especially considered. Various notions of movement – from amorphous outbursts of sounds to repetitive and crystalline rhythms - are at the core of the piece. The work is divided in six sections, exploring the multiple configurations of Iberê’s Spools series. The piece was premiered by the Nieuw Ensemble at the Musiekgebouw in Amsterdam, 2009.

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