Benjamin Ellin

British conductor and composer Benjamin Ellin  is currently artistic director of EMFEB (Every Music For EveryBody), music director of Thursford Productions, principal conductor of the Slaithwaite Philharmonic and Director of the Pembroke Academy of Music, London. 

Ellin was awarded 1st Prize and the Public Prize from the inaugural Evgeny Svetlanov International Conducting Competition in Luxembourg in 2007 and made his debut with the Luxembourg Philharmonic Orchestra, conducting Rachmaninov’s 2nd Symphony. He has since had conducting engagements with the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, the Russian State Symphony Orchestra, the New Russian Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra del Teatro Regio Turin, Teatro Massimo Palermo, Orchestre National de Lyon, the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra and Orchestre Chambre de Catalogne. This season will see him conduct concerts and operas in London, Moscow, St. Petersburg, Ekaterinburg, Montpellier and Montreal.

 In 2007 Ellin became the first classical composer to sign a deal with Prince’s Trust Music Publishing, and was profiled in the Rising Stars feature of BBC Music Magazine. In September 2009, Ellin was awarded the Barlow Endowment Prize for composition, becoming only the second British composer in 25 years to win the prize. His subsequent commission for a trombone concerto will be premiered by the New York Philharmonic’s principal trombonist, Joseph Alessi, in spring, 2011

 July 2010 will see the world premiere of his compositions for Trio Chausson and a new Song Cycle as part of the Imaginez Maintenant Festival in Amiens, where he is a featured artist. Other events in the near future include the Canadian premiere and tour of his work for solo viola and ensemble at the Fort Macleod International Festival with soloist Rivka Golani, the premiere of his Akhmatova Song Cycle, White Knight,  in London and the launch of the Pembroke House concert series.

Benjamin Ellin appears in the following:

Benjamin Ellin

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

A major work for brass and percussion, Nahstops 2 was written in 2004 for James Watson and the Royal Academy of Music in London. It is a dramatic and varied work composed for a large ensemble—the same size as that used in Elgar Howarth’s version of Pictures at an Exhibition—and while not programmatic, it is written in episodes or chapters. The extract here first splits the two sections of trombones and trumpets, with one group playing a vibrant dancelike theme and the other a broad melody, before combining the forces in a dramatic conclusion.

Comments [96]