Christopher Trapani

Christopher Trapani was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1980. He holds a Bachelor’s degree from Harvard, where he studied composition with Bernard Rands and poetry under Helen Vendler, and a Master's degree from the Royal College of Music in London, where he worked with Julian Anderson. He then spent four years in Paris, where he held a residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts and worked with the French composer Philippe Leroux.

As the recipient of a Fulbright grant, Christopher spent the 2007-2008 academic year studying Ottoman music in Istanbul, before returning to Paris to study electronic music for two years on the composition and music technology cursus at IRCAM. From September 2010 he is based in New York City, as a doctoral fellow at Columbia University.

Christopher is the winner of the 2007 Gaudeamus Prize, the first American in over thirty years to win the international young composers' award. He has also won the ASCAP Leo Kaplan Award (2009) as well as a BMI Student Composer Award (2006), three Morton Gould Young Composers Awards from ASCAP (2005, 2006, 2009), the Bearns Prize from Columbia University (2006) and the Wayne Peterson Prize from Earplay (2005). His scores have been performed by the Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, Nieuw Ensemble, Asko Ensemble, Ensemble L'Itinéraire, Earplay, members of the Philharmonia Orchestra, and the American Composers Orchestra. He has received commissions from the FleetBoston Celebrity Series (for pianist Sergey Schepkin), as well as the National Endowment for the Arts (for The Providence Singers).

Plans for the current season include a collaborative multimedia work at the Venice Biennale, and a piece for qanûn, hexaphonic electric guitar, ensemble, and electronics for the 2010 Agora festival at IRCAM. The 2010-11 season will include a commissioned piece for the American Composers Orchestra—a work for hexaphonic guitar and orchestra, with the composer as soloist, slated for Carnegie Hall in December 2010—and a portrait concert at the Royal Festival Hall in London on the Philharmonia Orchestra's Music of Today series. For current information, please see  www.christophertrapani.com

Christopher Trapani appears in the following:

Christopher Trapani

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Sparrow Episodes unfolds like a musical comic book, a series of consecutive snapshots. Musical material varies wildly from frame to frame, but together the episodes trace a single relentless forward narrative. Ideas are introduced and explored for very small spans of time (20 to 30 seconds on average); then, before they have a chance to develop, they are pushed aside to make way for the next idea.

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