Julie Burstein

Julie Burstein is a writer, radio host and producer who loves sitting in for Leonard Lopate. 

Julie Burstein is the creator and founding executive producer of Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, which won a Peabody Award in 2004. For twenty-five years, Julie has developed, produced, and directed award-winning radio programs such as the nationally broadcast series AT&T Presents Carnegie Hall Tonight, Time Warner Presents The New York Philharmonic, LIVE!, and Riverwalk, Live from the Landing.

Julie is noted for her talents in developing engaging new entertainment programming, her skill at helping talent from other media become effective radio personalities, her leadership of creative teams, and for her on-air presence as a host of music and talk shows for both commercial and non-commercial radio. In addition to extensive experience developing and producing weekly series and documentary specials, Julie Burstein was the first arts reporter for WHYY-FM in Philadelphia.

Throughout her career, Julie Burstein has been dedicated to exploring and presenting a broad range of culture on radio. She has directed live jazz performances on Riverwalk: Live from the Landing, produced Mostly Meshugah! The Music and Comedy of Mickey Katz, hosted by Katz's son Joel Grey, and reported stories for public radio news and information programs on everything from the contemporary sculpture of Jonathan Borofsky to the art of making Easter Peeps and Bunnies.

Julie Burstein graduated cum laude from Wesleyan University and was the recipient of an Asian Cultural Council Arts Fellowship for study in Japan, 1988-1989. Her work has received numerous awards, including two Peabody Awards.

Julie Burstein appears in the following:

Reflections on Elgar's Cello Concerto

Sunday, September 11, 2011

There’s a doubleness to listening to Jacqueline du Pre play Edward Elgar’s Cello Concerto. The music is powerful, beginning with vivid chords from the cello, which continues with a mournful, downward melody that is greeted by the winds. Jackie, as everyone called her, said she loved the piece because she “felt it had such a wide range of expression, it went from terrible pathos to ridiculous fun and amusement.”  

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