Ted Hearne

A native of Chicago, Ted Hearne (born 1982) is a composer, conductor and performer of new music. His work Katrina Ballads is the recipient of the 2009 Gaudeamus Prize in composition and will be heard this summer in a new production featuring film by renowned director Bill Morrison and on a new record to be released by New Amsterdam Records and distributed by Naxos of America. 

Hearne’s music has been performed by the Minnesota Orchestra, the Calder Quartet, The Knights, and the New York City Opera and has been heard at the MATA Festival, the Bang on a Can Marathon, Carlsbad Music Festival, and Le Poisson Rouge’s Sleeping Giant. Hearne has received commissions from Chicago's Third Coast Percussion, San Francisco's Volti Choral Arts Laboratory, Charleston's New Music Collective, Newspeak, the Huntsville Symphony, and the Albany Symphony. His work was recently praised by Allan Kozinn of The New York Times as “fresh and muscular.”

Hearne is the artistic director of Yes is a World and resident conductor of Red Light New Music and was composer-in-residence of the Chicago Children's Choir for five years. He served as music director for the premieres of David Lang’s opera Anatomy Theatre (performed by ICE in 2005), Michael Gordon’s Lightning at our Feet (at the BAM Next Wave Festival in 2008), and Bryan Senti's From the margins, this, unmentioned (at the Brooklyn Lyceum in 2009). Hearne received the 2008 Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and was an artist in residence at the MacDowell Colony in the autumn of 2009. Upcoming commissions include works for the Dither Electric Guitar Quartet and the Toomai String Quintet and a work for the Yale Glee Club and Yale Symphony Orchestra to be premiered at Carnegie Hall in April 2011.

Ted Hearne appears in the following:

Ted Hearne

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Katrina Ballads is an hour-long piece for a band of five singers and 11 musicians. The text is drawn entirely from primary-source material from the week following Hurricane Katrina: the words of survivors and relief workers, as well as politicians and celebrities like Anderson Cooper, Kanye West, George W. Bush and his mother Barbara—all disseminated by national media outlets and immediately archived forever on the internet.

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