Tom Brokaw

On December 1, 2004, one of the most trusted and respected figures in broadcast journalism, Tom Brokaw, stepped down after 21 years as the anchor and managing editor of "NBC Nightly News." Brokaw will continue with NBC News for the next ten years, reporting and producing long-form documentaries and providing expertise during breaking news events.

 

In June 2005, Brokaw returned to primetime with an hour-long documentary "Tom Brokaw Reports: The Long War" about the war on terror. For the documentary, Brokaw traveled around the world - to Afghanistan , Pakistan , Iran , Saudi Arabia , France and Washington D.C. - to interview world leaders, intelligence experts and those personally affected by the events of Sept. 11. In July 2005, Brokaw reported another hour-long documentary, "The Secret Man: The Story of Watergate's Deep Throat ," and in September 2005, he reported on the religious revolution sweeping the country in "Tom Brokaw Reports: In God they Trust."
During the fall of 2005, Brokaw has received numerous honors, including the Records of Achievement Award from The Foundation for the National Archives, the Association of the U.S. Army honored him with their highest award, the George Catlett Marshall Medal, first ever to a journalist; and he was inducted as a fellow into the prestigious the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Prior to stepping down as anchor of "Nightly News," Brokaw traveled to Iraq in June 2004 to cover the handover of power and reported for five days for all NBC News programs and MSNBC. In addition to interviewing a mix of newsmakers including Iraq's interim president Ghazi Al Yawer, General David Petraeus, the American General who is charged with rebuilding the Iraqi security forces, and securing an exclusive interview with General Ricardo Sanchez, the man who was in charge of the American forces in Iraq when Saddam Hussein was captured, Brokaw patrolled the dangerous Baghdad streets in a humvee convoy with the First Cavalry Division, and also reported on student life in Baghdad with the class of 2004.
Brokaw was the only network evening news anchor to report from Normandy , France during the D-Day 60th Anniversary ceremonies in June, 2004. He had exclusive interviews with French President Jacques Chirac in Paris and President George W. Bush at the American Cemetery Normandy Beach in Colleville-sur-Mer , France on June 6, the 60th Anniversary of D-Day. In February 2004, Brokaw returned to the Asian subcontinent to report on the challenges Pakistan and Afghanistan face as they continue to fight the war on terror. In addition to securing exclusive interviews Pakistan president Gen. Pervez Musharraf and Afghan president Hamid Karzai, Brokaw traveled with the Pakistani army to mountainous and barren terrain along the border with Afghanistan as they hunted for Al Qaeda and also reported from Southeastern Afghanistan, the base of the 10 th Mountain Division, where U.S. soldiers are not only hunting for Al Qaeda, but trying to win the hearts and minds of the people as well.   
In 2003, as the international controversy escalated over the increasing likelihood of war with Iraq , Brokaw traveled overseas to the diplomatic and military hotspots throughout the Middle East and the Gulf. On March 19, 2003 , Brokaw was the first American news anchor to report that the war with Iraq had begun, and in April 2003, he landed the first television interview with President Bush after the President declared the end of major combat. During the summer of 2003, Brokaw was the first evening news anchor to return to Baghdad to report for five nights for "NBC Nightly News" and "Dateline NBC" on post-war Iraq and the reconstruction efforts.   
Brokaw has an impressive series of additional "firsts," including the first exclusive U.S. one-on-one interview with Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev, earning an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award. Brokaw was the first and only anchor to report from the scene the night the Berlin Wall fell, and was the first American anchor to travel to Tibet to report on human-rights abuses and to conduct an interview with the Dalai Lama.
In addition to "Nightly News," Brokaw has recently reported a series of hour-long documentaries, "Tom Brokaw Reports." Tackling such diverse topics as literacy, affirmative action, drunk driving, corporate scandals, immigration policies, and education, his in-depth reporting has earned critical praise. Brokaw has also reported documentaries of international importance, including "The Road to Baghdad" where he documented the path to possible war with Iraq through the eyes of half a dozen people at the center of the crisis, and "The Lost Boys," a story about how the ongoing war in Sudan forced the "lost boys" out of their villages in the 1980s, which won a National Press Club Award.
Brokaw's documentary reporting has been recognized with numerous awards, including the prestigious Peabody award in 2004 for "Tom Brokaw Reports: A Question of Fairness" in which he examined the issue of affirmative action through the controversy surrounding the University of Michigan and its affirmative action policy, which detailed the continuing struggle to deal with race, fairness and higher education in America. In 1989, Brokaw was awarded his first Peabody award for "To Be An American," a documentary about the American tapestry: who we are, how we got here and what it means to become a new citizen. In 2003, he won an  Emmy for Outstanding Interview for "America Remembers: 9/11 Air Traffic Controllers." In 1997, Brokaw won another Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism for "Why Can't We Live Together," a documentary that examined the hidden realities of racial separation in America 's suburbs.  
Brokaw's insight, ability and integrity have earned him numerous other awards for his journalistic achievements, including several Emmy, Overseas Press Club and National Headliner awards. In 2003, "NBC Nightly News" was honored with the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Newscast, representing the program's fourth consecutive win in this category.
The NBC News anchor also has a distinguished record as a political reporter. He has covered every presidential election since 1968 and was NBC's White House correspondent during the national trauma of Watergate (1973-1976). From 1984 through this presidential election cycle, Brokaw will have anchored all of NBC's political coverage, including primaries, national conventions and election nights, and he has moderated nine primary and/or general election debates.
Complementing his distinguished broadcast journalism career, Brokaw has written articles, essays and commentary for several publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, Newsweek, Time, Sports Illustrated, Life, National Geographic, Outside and Interview.
In 1998, Brokaw became a best selling author with the publication of "The Greatest Generation." Inspired by the mountain of mail he received from his first book, Brokaw wrote "The Greatest Generation Speaks" in 1999. His third book, "An Album of Memories," was published in 2001. In November 2002, his fourth best selling book "A Long Way from Home," a reflective look about growing up in the American Heartland, was released.
Brokaw began his journalism career in 1962 at KMTV in Omaha , Nebraska . He anchored the late evening news on Atlanta 's WSB-TV in 1965 before joining KNBC-TV in Los Angeles . He was hired by NBC News in 1966 and from 1976-1981 he anchored NBC News' "Today" program. 

In June 2005, Brokaw returned to primetime with an hour-long documentary "Tom Brokaw Reports: The Long War" about the war on terror. For the documentary, Brokaw traveled around the world - to Afghanistan , Pakistan , Iran , Saudi Arabia , France and Washington D.C. - to interview world leaders, intelligence experts and those personally affected by the events of Sept. 11. In July 2005, Brokaw reported another hour-long documentary, "The Secret Man: The Story of Watergate's Deep Throat ," and in September 2005, he reported on the religious revolution sweeping the country in "Tom Brokaw Reports: In God they Trust."

During the fall of 2005, Brokaw has received numerous honors, including the Records of Achievement Award from The Foundation for the National Archives, the Association of the U.S. Army honored him with their highest award, the George Catlett Marshall Medal, first ever to a journalist; and he was inducted as a fellow into the prestigious the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Prior to stepping down as anchor of "Nightly News," Brokaw traveled to Iraq in June 2004 to cover the handover of power and reported for five days for all NBC News programs and MSNBC. In addition to interviewing a mix of newsmakers including Iraq's interim president Ghazi Al Yawer, General David Petraeus, the American General who is charged with rebuilding the Iraqi security forces, and securing an exclusive interview with General Ricardo Sanchez, the man who was in charge of the American forces in Iraq when Saddam Hussein was captured, Brokaw patrolled the dangerous Baghdad streets in a humvee convoy with the First Cavalry Division, and also reported on student life in Baghdad with the class of 2004.

 

Brokaw was the only network evening news anchor to report from Normandy , France during the D-Day 60th Anniversary ceremonies in June, 2004. He had exclusive interviews with French President Jacques Chirac in Paris and President George W. Bush at the American Cemetery Normandy Beach in Colleville-sur-Mer , France on June 6, the 60th Anniversary of D-Day. In February 2004, Brokaw returned to the Asian subcontinent to report on the challenges Pakistan and Afghanistan face as they continue to fight the war on terror. In addition to securing exclusive interviews Pakistan president Gen. Pervez Musharraf and Afghan president Hamid Karzai, Brokaw traveled with the Pakistani army to mountainous and barren terrain along the border with Afghanistan as they hunted for Al Qaeda and also reported from Southeastern Afghanistan, the base of the 10 th Mountain Division, where U.S. soldiers are not only hunting for Al Qaeda, but trying to win the hearts and minds of the people as well.   

In 2003, as the international controversy escalated over the increasing likelihood of war with Iraq , Brokaw traveled overseas to the diplomatic and military hotspots throughout the Middle East and the Gulf. On March 19, 2003 , Brokaw was the first American news anchor to report that the war with Iraq had begun, and in April 2003, he landed the first television interview with President Bush after the President declared the end of major combat. During the summer of 2003, Brokaw was the first evening news anchor to return to Baghdad to report for five nights for "NBC Nightly News" and "Dateline NBC" on post-war Iraq and the reconstruction efforts.   

Brokaw has an impressive series of additional "firsts," including the first exclusive U.S. one-on-one interview with Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev, earning an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award. Brokaw was the first and only anchor to report from the scene the night the Berlin Wall fell, and was the first American anchor to travel to Tibet to report on human-rights abuses and to conduct an interview with the Dalai Lama.

In addition to "Nightly News," Brokaw has recently reported a series of hour-long documentaries, "Tom Brokaw Reports." Tackling such diverse topics as literacy, affirmative action, drunk driving, corporate scandals, immigration policies, and education, his in-depth reporting has earned critical praise. Brokaw has also reported documentaries of international importance, including "The Road to Baghdad" where he documented the path to possible war with Iraq through the eyes of half a dozen people at the center of the crisis, and "The Lost Boys," a story about how the ongoing war in Sudan forced the "lost boys" out of their villages in the 1980s, which won a National Press Club Award.

Brokaw's documentary reporting has been recognized with numerous awards, including the prestigious Peabody award in 2004 for "Tom Brokaw Reports: A Question of Fairness" in which he examined the issue of affirmative action through the controversy surrounding the University of Michigan and its affirmative action policy, which detailed the continuing struggle to deal with race, fairness and higher education in America. In 1989, Brokaw was awarded his first Peabody award for "To Be An American," a documentary about the American tapestry: who we are, how we got here and what it means to become a new citizen. In 2003, he won an  Emmy for Outstanding Interview for "America Remembers: 9/11 Air Traffic Controllers." In 1997, Brokaw won another Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism for "Why Can't We Live Together," a documentary that examined the hidden realities of racial separation in America 's suburbs.  

Brokaw's insight, ability and integrity have earned him numerous other awards for his journalistic achievements, including several Emmy, Overseas Press Club and National Headliner awards. In 2003, "NBC Nightly News" was honored with the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Newscast, representing the program's fourth consecutive win in this category.

The NBC News anchor also has a distinguished record as a political reporter. He has covered every presidential election since 1968 and was NBC's White House correspondent during the national trauma of Watergate (1973-1976). From 1984 through this presidential election cycle, Brokaw will have anchored all of NBC's political coverage, including primaries, national conventions and election nights, and he has moderated nine primary and/or general election debates.

Complementing his distinguished broadcast journalism career, Brokaw has written articles, essays and commentary for several publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, Newsweek, Time, Sports Illustrated, Life, National Geographic, Outside and Interview.

In 1998, Brokaw became a best selling author with the publication of "The Greatest Generation." Inspired by the mountain of mail he received from his first book, Brokaw wrote "The Greatest Generation Speaks" in 1999. His third book, "An Album of Memories," was published in 2001. In November 2002, his fourth best selling book "A Long Way from Home," a reflective look about growing up in the American Heartland, was released.

Brokaw began his journalism career in 1962 at KMTV in Omaha , Nebraska . He anchored the late evening news on Atlanta 's WSB-TV in 1965 before joining KNBC-TV in Los Angeles . He was hired by NBC News in 1966 and from 1976-1981 he anchored NBC News' "Today" program. 

 

Tom Brokaw appears in the following:

American Composers

Sunday, July 04, 2010

In this July 4th special edition, we will explore music by American composers – works chosen by 11 of our guests including Tom Brokaw, Condoleezza Rice, Alan Alda and Renée Fleming.

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American Composers

Sunday, June 03, 2007

As part of WNYC’s American Music Festival, a special edition of “Mad About Music” with host Gilbert Kaplan explores the popularity of American composers by revisiting appearances of 11 of its 55 guests who chose an American work to be played on the show – including Tom Brokaw, Alan Alda, Renee Fleming and Condoleezza Rice.

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Tom Brokaw

Sunday, February 05, 2006

For more than 20 years as news anchor for NBC, Tom Brokaw has been a model of cool dispassionate delivery. But here he reveals his emotional side to host Gilbert Kaplan and the power music plays in his life – from Bach cantatas in the cockpit flying cross country, to Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man, Mozart’s Requiem and the American classic “Shenandoah,” that touches his Missouri River roots and has been picked to be played at his funeral.

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