China In New York Banner

January 22-27, 2012

In China today, interest in classical music is exploding: More than 50 million Chinese children study classical instruments, concert halls are popping up in the major cities and the provinces and Chinese composers and musicians are forging new paths on the global stage. Through an in-depth look at composers and musicians who were born in China and are now active in New York, WQXR celebrates how these artists are influencing the world of classical music and fusing age-old traditions with a potent sense of discovery.

Recently in China in New York

Evoking China, Part Two

Saturday, January 28, 2012

Concluding WQXR's China in New York festival, David Garland offers more film music that brings together East and West, blending Chinese and Western instruments.

Comments [1]

Written on the Wind: Huang Ruo and Min Xiao-fen

Friday, January 27, 2012

Tonight at 7 pm in The Greene Space, composer Huang Ruo joins host David Garland for an evening of conversation and premiere performances from New York and China-based composers.

Comments [5]

Interview: Musical Polymath Min Xiao-fen

Friday, January 27, 2012

Born in Nanjing, composer, singer, and pipa player Min Xiao-fen has become a fixture on the new-music, jazz and Chinese traditional musical scenes. Collaborations with such artists as John Zorn, Christian Marclay, Randy Weston, DJ Spooky, and Derek Bailey attest to her relentlessly exploratory spirit and open-minded approach to improvisation and music-making.

Comment

Interview: Ambassador and Visionary Chou Wen-chung

Thursday, January 26, 2012

It would difficult to overstate the importance of Chou Wen-chung when it comes to contemporary music. Not only has he developed over the course of his almost 90 years a shimmering, pointillistic yet lyrical style, but he edited and completed many of his teacher Edgard Varèse's works.

Comments [1]

Café Concert: Shenyang

Thursday, January 26, 2012

To see Shenyang in an opera house, you might not guess that he's capable of delivering delicate art songs with subtle expressions. But he has begun championing Chinese art songs, as these videos show.

Comments [2]

Interview: Conductor Long Yu

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Born in 1964, Maestro Long Yu has a lot on his plate. He is currently the artistic director and chief conductor of the China Philharmonic, music director of the Shanghai and Guanzhou Symphony Orchestras, and artistic director of the Beijing Music Festival.

Comment

Calligraffiti: from China to New York

Thursday, January 26, 2012

This Thursday, January 26 at 8:30 pm, ET, Q2 Music streams an eclectic set of chamber and vocal works from award-winning Chinese composer Huang Ruo, as recorded live on January 10 at Greenwich Village's (Le) Poisson Rouge.

Comment

Huang Ruo Sings His Top Five Chinese Folk Songs

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Huang Ruo, a Chinese-born New York-based composer, edited the anthology Selection of Classic Chinese Folk Songs. He shares his five favorites in this video.

Comments [2]

Discover Gems in New York City's Chinatowns

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Listen to the next episode of the Food in Two Worlds podcast for a special Year of the Dragon culinary tour.

Comment

Video: The Shanghai Quartet Comes to Flushing, Queens

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

WQXR kicked off the China in New York festival in the heart of Flushing’s Chinatown with a performance event by the Shanghai String Quartet.

Comment

Interview: Composer Lei Liang on Cultural Identity

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Tianjin-born and California-native composer Lei Liang joins us from a studio in Rome to discuss his creative process, the importance of putting the weight of one's life into every sounding note, and the manner in which cultural identity manifests itself in his music.

Comment

Audio Slideshow: China's New Concert Halls

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Architectural historian Victoria Newhouse spent time touring China's "grand theaters." She discusses the more noteworthy facilities in this slideshow.

Comments [2]

Composer Chen Yi Remembers the Cultural Revolution

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Born in 1953, violinist, composer and professor Chen Yi grew up during the cultural revolution in China, which left its mark on her family life and her music.  At age 13 she was sent to a communist labor farm, smuggling her violin beside her bed.

Comments [1]

China's Embrace of Western Classical Music: A Timeline

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Entwined with national politics, the story of Western music in China is surprisingly modern. This timeline highlights the major developments:

Comments [2]

Happy Chinese New Year!

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

As part of WQXR’s China in New York festival, this week’s show features a visit with three young Chinese artists: tenor Yi Li, pianist Zhu Wang and pianist Chu-Fang Huang.

Comment

Erhu or Pipa: Choose Your Chinese Instrument

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

This week’s Showdown is between two concertos for traditional Chinese instruments: the pipa and the ehru. Tell us which you prefer and we'll play the winner at 12 noon.

Comments [17]

My Journey Through China: Chaos and Harmony

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

"China was always just a myth to me, a patchwork of anecdotes, news reports, and a weird middle-name given to me at birth," writes our correspondent. "And now, it was about to become real."

Read More

Comments [7]

Lang Lang's Top Five Pieces by Liszt

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Lang Lang's flamboyant performing style has earned him frequent comparisons to Franz Liszt, so it's telling that he has staked out that composer's work as a specialty. He explains why in this video.

Comments [2]

New York Philharmonic Celebrates Chinese New Year

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Tonight at 7:30 pm, a live broadcast from the New York Philharmonic with piano showman Lang Lang, guest choir Quintessenso and the conductor Long Yu.

Comments [8]

Interview: Downtown Staple Composer-Performer Du Yun

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

As an active presence on the New York new-music scene, the young Shanghai-born composer Du Yun cuts a striking figure. From prestigious work with New York City Opera and The New Juilliard Ensemble to downtown, electronic experimentation with the International Contemporary Ensemble and schizoid balladry at Cornelia Street Cafe, Du Yun is a distinctive voice that will stretch well into the 21st century.

Comment