Part of Classical 105.9 WQXR, Q2 Music is a listener-supported, New York-based online station devoted to the music of living composers; a home for immersive festivals, live webcasts and on-demand concerts from today’s leading new-music performers and venues.

Recently in Q2 Music

Crouching Composer, Hidden Dragon

Monday, August 22, 2011

This week on the New Canon, violinist Ryu Goto, cellist Dane Johansen and the Metropolis Ensemble's Andrew Cyr talk about their recent work with Tan Dun's Martial Arts Trilogy and the fine line between film score and classical music. Our chat starts on Monday at 4pm.

Comments [1]

Summer, Repeating

Monday, August 22, 2011

Summer Festivals are simply the best thing. My parents taught at BUTI when I was a little kid, and aside from two slightly horrifying summers at Girl Scout camp (where I did, incidentally, at least learn how to sail a Sunfish), I spent every summer of my life through age 24 at a music festival. It’s all about chamber music and picnicking, it really is.

Comments [4]

Gavin Bryars on Cadman Requiem

Sunday, August 21, 2011

I last saw my friend and sound engineer Bill Cadman in Paris at the beginning of December 1988 when we had a drink together. On December 21st, Bill and his new girlfriend Sophie were killed in the Lockerbie air crash. I was very badly affected by his death and for some time I found it hard to sleep and had constant nightmares. I wrote an obituary for The Independent newspaper shortly after his death, which helped me quite a lot.

Comment

Look & Listen Festival: Part III

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Cease the last full month of Summer with the Look & Listen Festival running through August here on Cued Up. For the fest's third concert of four, enjoy two world premieres by the delightfully unclassifiable drummer/composer John Hollenbeck and his group The Claudia Quintet with Theo Bleckmann, a world premiere by past Q2 composer-portrait Angélica Negrón and works by toy piano wiz Phyllis Chen and textural magician Zibuokle Martinaityte.

Comment

Quiet Acts of Kindness

Saturday, August 20, 2011

As part of Q2's Requiem Project, we've been searching the NYPR archives for voices that offer perspective on 9/11 and help us better understand the world in which we now live. The stories that immediately stood out to me were of the volunteers who for months helped feed, clothe and comfort the people working at the site. "We have to understand that their existence in millions for each evil act is what keeps us going," the late evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould told WNYC's Marianne McCune.

Comment

Elysian Fields

Friday, August 19, 2011

(Le) Poisson Rouge has become the go-to venue to host a record release party so it is no surprise that the Brooklyn-based indie band Elysian Fields booked a slot on June 14 to celebrate its newest record Last Night on Earth. Led by co-founders, Oren Bloedow and Jennifer Charles, joined by a host of stellar musicians, the band treats their (L)PR audience to an unforgettable record kick-off featuring songs off their brand-new album.

Comment

Ingram Marshall on Gradual Requiem

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Musicians write requiems for all sorts of reasons. The Connecticut composer Ingram Marshall wrote his seminal tape piece Gradual Requiem in tribute to his father, who had recently died. He explains its significance.

Comments [1]

Requiems Discovered

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Over the next few weeks, as we listen to your requiem suggestions and start to sketch out the 9/11 anniversary weekend programming, a ton of new music will be crossing our desks. But some of our recent discoveries are simply too moving to wait an additional moment before sharing: including work by a Polish film composer, a Ukrainian romantic, and a requiem based on Latvian folk songs.

Comments [3]

The Absolute Ensemble Goes Multiculti with Arabian Nights

Monday, August 15, 2011

Q2's Album of the Week relives a 2007 Town Hall concert that bridges East and West, old and new, courtesy of the Absolute Ensemble and Kristjan Järvi. Read on to get a free download.

Comment

The Most Magical Flute

Monday, August 15, 2011

On Thursday, August 11, the International Contemporary Ensemble performed its final concert as part of their residency at this year's Mostly Mozart Festival. The performance was led by conductor-composer Matthias Pintscher against the backdrop of the New York City skyline at Lincoln Center's Kaplan Penthouse, and featured a New York premiere by Jonathan Harvey and two world premieres from ICElab composers Steve Lehman and Phyllis Chen. The evening also included John Zorn's Chistabal for five flutists and the otherworldly Rondo for glass armonica, K. 617 by Mozart.

Comment

The Space Between

Monday, August 15, 2011

“There is no such thing as an empty space or an empty time. There is always something to see, something to hear. In fact, try as we may to make a silence, we cannot.” Can you guess which composer spoke these words? Don’t worry, I’ll wait!

Comments [2]

Finn-tasia

Monday, August 15, 2011

"Finland, Finland, Finland, the country where I want to be," sang Monty Python. But why exactly is it that Finland is a hotbed for composers? We investigate with Helsinkian composer Markku Klami and Bard Music Festival's scholar-in-residence Daniel Grimley.

Comments [1]

Look and Listen: Part II

Sunday, August 14, 2011

On Sunday at 2 pm, Cued Up features the second of four programs featuring performances from the Look and Listen Festival. On tap is a quiet storm of music by John Cage, Colin Jacobsen, Jason Treuting, Elliott Carter and John Musto.

Comment

The Requiem Project

Friday, August 12, 2011

Although it stems from a specific religious tradition, the requiem has become a versatile, generous form through which many composers have addressed the fundamental human concerns surrounding mortality. Requiems mourn the dead, and they’re appropriately reverent and solemn. But they also can be dramatic and uplifting. Ten years after the events of September 11, 2001, the requiem continues to be a valuable form for exploring the lasting shock, anger and sorrow of loss — and for celebrating what remains.

Comments [10]

A Musical Memory Space

Friday, August 12, 2011

John Adams was one of the first major composers to take on the challenge of writing a work to commemorate the events of September 11, 2001. His Pulitzer Prize-winning work On the Transmigration of Souls is something of a sound collage, performed by orchestra and choirs along with pre-recorded ambient sound: we hear a voice reading names of people who were lost in the towers, the choirs singing reminiscences of their family members.

Comments [1]

Share Your Music

Thursday, August 11, 2011

For more than 500 years, Western classical music has used the requiem mass to bury the departed and console the living. Nearly 2,000 requiems have been written, to date — and that isn't even counting all the secular works meant to address the realities of death and mortality. 

Comments [44]

Share Your Memories

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Sometimes the enormity of a moment is captured by something small — the details of the everyday take on new meaning. What do you remember from September 11, 2001 and its immediate aftermath? What memory or observation stands out, and why?

Comments [8]

A Stunning Menagerie from Arlene Sierra

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

At times, composer Arlene Sierra’s catalog reads more like an inventory of the Museum of Natural History with titles like Insects in Amber, Cricket-Viol, Cicada Shell and Birds and Insects, Book 1. Even her inclusion in the New York Philharmonic’s inaugural CONTACT! series in December of 2009, Game of Attrition, was based on Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection. Likewise, Sierra’s works are full of feline cunningness, birdlike chirps, beastly savage turns and serpentine seduction.

Comment

Much Ado about Igor

Monday, August 08, 2011

This week we’re taking a cue from Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart festival and becoming hopelessly devoted to Stravinsky and his influence. Are you ready for serious childhood dorkery? Here goes; I am not ashamed. When I was in ninth or tenth grade, I cut the names of three composers out of construction paper (construction paper!!) and stuck them up on the window-free walls of my room.

Comments [5]

International Contemporary Ensemble Does Old and New

Monday, August 08, 2011

Join Q2 for live tapings from the 2011 Mostly Mozart Festival's Kaplan Penthouse of the adventurous International Contemporary Ensemble on Monday, August 8 at 10:30 p.m. and Thursday, August 11 at 10:30 p.m. Conductor Pablo Heras-Casado and Matthias Pintscher, respectively, lead the ensemble through intimate programs of modernist and contemporary icons, including Igor Stravinsky and John Zorn.

Comment