Verdi's Simon Boccanegra

« previous episode | next episode »

Saturday, February 05, 2011

Verdi's Simon Boccanegra features some of the Italian master's most beautiful and challenging music, setting the tone for a tale of class tension in 14th-century Genoa.

"It’s one of the most complicated baritone roles ever written!" exclaimed Dmitri Hvorostovsky in a Met interview regarding his leading role. "The musical challenges are obvious when you listen to the opera, but the human side and the acting is even more demanding."

With this run of the opera, the Siberian-born Hvorostovsky takes on the troubled doge for the first time at the Met, adding in his interview, "It has always been my dream to become a Verdi baritone, and I have put a lot of work and faith into this path of my career." Maestro James Levine returns to the Met podium to lead one of his favorite operas.

 

Cast:

Conductor: James Levine

Amelia: Barbara Frittoli

Gabriele: Ramón Vargas

Simon: Dmitri Hvorostovsky

Fiesco: Ferruccio Furlanetto

The WQXR e-newsletter. Show highlights, links to music news, on-demand concerts, events from The Greene Space and more.

Comments [5]

Fred M.Wiesenfeld Sr. from Sheepshead Bay,Brooklyn

My congratulations to the cast for their fine performances.However, the conductor James Levine deserves the best accolade
as his music is devine.I can not imagine the Met without Maestro James Levine.

Feb. 06 2011 10:46 PM
elizabeth from UPS Manhattan

i can only echo Ken Lane. Spectacular.

Feb. 05 2011 06:26 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane

KUDOS, KUDOS, KUDOS TO ALL !!!

Feb. 05 2011 05:53 PM
concetta nardone from Elmont, NY

Larry is right. Talk Talk Talk. Ms. Juntwait does a fine job all by herself.

Feb. 05 2011 04:17 PM
larry eisenberg from nyc

What a pleasure to hear Simon B.,
With top voices sheer ecstasy!
One less commentator
Would be an elator,
Ms Juntwait is enough for me!

Feb. 05 2011 03:47 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.