Musicians from Marlboro

This program previously aired on January 17, 2010

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Sunday, January 16, 2011

Vermont's famous and long-running Marlboro Festival, founded in 1951 by Rudolf Serkin and Adolf Busch, is a unique environment for a chamber musician to spend the summer.

This is a place where a young professional can collaborate side-by-side with an experienced master artist on a level playing field. The result? First-quality music-making, and a family environment unlike any other in the classical music world. Listen in this week as Bill McGlaughlin welcomes a part of this musical family into the studio. Musicians from Marlboro will play a wide variety of music from Mozart to Carter, with a little Ravel and Poulenc too, for good measure. Find out what makes the Marlboro Festival so special, and get to know these musicians through their playing and their words.

Music Played in the Program:

Elliott Carter: Eight Etudes and a Fantasy for Woodwind Quartet

—I. Maestoso
—IV. Vivace
Wolfgang Amadé Mozart: Quintet in E flat Major for Piano and Winds, K. 452
—I. Largo: Allegro moderato
—II. Larghetto
—III. Rondo: Allegretto
Maurice Ravel: Chansons madécasses (Madagascan songs)(1926)
(Text: Evariste Desire de Forges Parny (1753-1814))
—I. Nahandove
Francis Poulenc: Sextuor for Piano, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, and Horn
—I. Allegro vivace: Trés Vite et emporte

Gilbert Kalish, piano
Valérie Tessa Chermiset, flute
Rudy Vrbsky, oboe
Alexander Fiterstein, clarinet
Shinyee Na, bassoon
Paul S. LaFollette III, horn
Earl Lee, cello
Thomas Meglioranza, baritone

For more informatio about this episode, please visit the Saint Paul Sunday Web site.

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Comments [1]

ginni from nj

gosh and I was getting involved in the story- well just have to listen to the music ;)

Jan. 16 2011 09:42 PM

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