At Night

Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 07:26 PM

Like drive-in movie theaters, fireflies, and fireworks, some things are just meant for the nighttime.

This week on Q2 with Terrance McKnight we'll listen to music that was written for, or about things nocturnal.

We'll hear lullabies, lieder, serenades, and music played at rent parties.

Is there music that you associate with nighttime or are there particular compositions that are best after the sun goes down? 

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Comments [22]

We would like to encourage users to express their opinions in the correct forum so that they can be addressed by the appropriate people. This blog is meant for responses to Terrance's comment, posted above.

For more general concerns about the station, please email Listener Services (listenerservices@wqxr.org) or post on the Listener Services blog (http://blogs.wnyc.org/listenerservices/2009/10/16/listener-services-forum-wqxr/). We are in the midst of developing a Listener Services blog for the WQXR site.

Dec. 03 2009 12:49 AM

We recommend that users review the Comment Guidelines before posting on our blogs. You can find a link to the page in any "Leave a Comment" box.

In order to facilitate constructive conversations surrounding the intended topic of the blog, we encourage users to email Listener Services (listenerservices@wqxr.org) or post on the Listener Services blog (http://blogs.wnyc.org/listenerservices/2009/10/16/listener-services-forum-wqxr/) with more general concerns about the station.

Dec. 01 2009 10:22 AM
Richard S Mitnick from Highland Park, New Jersey

Terrance-

Please announce that the 105.9 web stream is now and finally at 128kbit and stereo that the music and the listeners deserve.

Nov. 30 2009 07:22 PM
Michael Meltzer

In the pop/jazz idiom, three short pieces (about 3 minutes each) that segue well:
Harlem Nocturne, Georgie Auld recording / Stan Kenton: Opus in Pastels (It's a saxophone quartet, not the big band) / Night Train, Buddy Morrow recording. Classical or not, these are perfect pieces of music.

Nov. 29 2009 03:25 AM
mark mendlovsky from new york

thank you Terrance for playing such great music! It is a pleasure to hear your selections, uplifts the spirit and soul
your choices are optomistic and just wonderful ..... thank you again,

Nov. 28 2009 10:48 PM

We would like to encourage users to express their opinions in the correct forum so that they can be addressed by the appropriate people. This blog is meant for responses to Terrance's question, posted above.

For concerns about programming and staff, please email Listener Services (listenerservices@wqxr.org) or post on the Listener Services blog (http://blogs.wnyc.org/listenerservices/2009/10/16/listener-services-forum-wqxr/).

Nov. 28 2009 01:49 PM
Frank Feldman

The end of the Alpine Symphony. The mezzo movement of Mahler 3. Prologue, Act 2, Gotterdammerung. Norn Scene, Gotterdammerung. Transfigured Night (duh). End of Act 2, Schweigsame Frau of Strauss. Act 2, Tristan. Much else besides.

Nov. 25 2009 10:05 PM
Nancy de Flon from Metro NY

Terrance, am listening to Paul Creston's beautiful piece on WQXR. His book "Principles of Rhythm": for Creston rhythm was the underlying element in his compositions. He began with the rhythm, built harmonies as the next layer, and finally he "melodized the harmony," as he put it, composed the melody from the harmonic layer. How do I know this? I studied composition with him in one of my former lives. He used that book as his course text.

Nov. 25 2009 08:11 PM

We would like to encourage users to express their opinions in the correct forum so that they can be addressed by the appropriate people. This blog is meant for responses to Terrance's question, posted above.

For concerns about programming and staff, please email Listener Services (listenerservices@wqxr.org) or post on the Listener Services blog (http://blogs.wnyc.org/listenerservices/2009/10/16/listener-services-forum-wqxr/).

Nov. 25 2009 10:02 AM
SusanW from NYC

Got home from BAM (Philip Glass' astonishing "Kepler") in time to catch the end of your show Saturday night. "Round Midnight" was simply beautiful as was the lullaby which closed the evening. Wonderful programming, wonderful hosting, wonderful end of day...thanks, Terrence!

Nov. 24 2009 07:21 PM

We recommend that users review the Comment Guidelines before posting on our blogs. You can find a link to the page in any "Leave a Comment" box.

In order to facilitate constructive conversations surrounding the intended topic of the blog, we encourage users to email Listener Services (listenerservices@wqxr.org) or post on the Listener Services blog (http://blogs.wnyc.org/listenerservices/2009/10/16/listener-services-forum-wqxr/) with concerns about programming and hosts.

Nov. 23 2009 10:43 AM
WinterBV from Asbury Park NJ

I go to sleep listening, hoping the music will find its way into my dreams - as it typically does. Thank you for being the score to my nights.

Nov. 22 2009 11:31 AM
Russ from NYC

Your show is as good as that fellow who was on WCLK for years on saturday nights. Later he moved to WABE. Mad Props.

Nov. 22 2009 12:00 AM
Greg from Warwick NY

I'm listening to the Rachmaninoff All Night Vigil and I think I've heard some of this before in a version of Vespers he wrote.

Nov. 21 2009 10:40 PM
Tom, Cooper Sq.

Magnus Lindberg's Linea d'Ombra exemplifies what we need more of. It's superlative, and invites deeper investigation, more-searching listening. All of Erik Satie is music for standing at the night window and watching the city inter-be; seeing those joyous scholars at other writing desks, discovering the unbounded potential, then noticing that they too are looking up and smiling back at the little silhouette that is me, here, at experience's brink. Ciao, T

Nov. 18 2009 09:03 PM
Pryor Dodge from New York

Greetings,

Just now listening to Susan Graham singing Les Nuits d'Ete. My favorite recording of this is with Regine Crespin, which, I've been told, is one of her best recordings.

Nov. 18 2009 08:17 PM
Jonathan Kaplan

Amazing piece by Richard Strauss on Death and Transfiguration last night. Thank you for telling the story behind it. It provided the perfect soundtrack as I drove home on Atlantic Ave. in Brooklyn and contemplated my existence.

Nov. 18 2009 12:34 PM
Eric Siegeltuch from New York

Terrence:
You and your program are terrific, but...it seems now that NYC has taken over the QXR website and made what was an extremely user-friendly site for those of us who listen in our cars and do not have the chance to hear entire pieces - and find out their identity - and turned it into the profoundly un-user-friendly NYC site.
For example, at around 8:30 tonight I was coming home and listened to what sounded a bit like a Phillip Glass piece - perhaps - so I went on the "new" WQXR site, which used to have a listing of what was played an hour ago, a day ago, a week ago. You could find out the information immediately, instead of searching in vain and never finding it on the NYC site. It is extremely frustrating, and annoying. If you have any clout perhaps you could interest them in providing a site which works - for us, particularly for your shows, since you thankfully offer a wide range of often unfamiliar material. It would be a HUGE move in the right direction. Thank you.

Nov. 17 2009 11:45 PM
andrea from nyc

terrence -

we are so happy to see you have a new home. we worried that you moved without leaving a forwarding address.

my friend jim agrees.

btw- your enunciating is exquisite

Nov. 17 2009 11:25 PM
Vigilante

The basic facts about a piece of music plus an amusing anecdote is all that's required; we do not need a disquisition or compositional analysis. Your introductions are so long that it's necessary to go on line to see what the hell you were talking about.

Please also review your vowels: bring is not brang. This is no place for quaint dialect.

Nov. 17 2009 10:05 PM
Reggie from jersey city

Please allow off topic to echo the last point by James.
Tonight is your best WQXR night because it’s like what Evening Music had become the last year on WNYC, music all over new and old, known and unknown. I love “Classical” But three “Lark Ascending” offerings in three days. It was mirroring Top-40 radio. Hope you can duplicate tonight every night.

Nov. 17 2009 09:51 PM
James Gary from Brooklyn, yo.

As an artist, I suppose "night music" for me has been associated with working alone in my studio after midnight, and hearing (on my computer or on the radio) a long, involved work like Bach's "St Matthew Passion," Mahler's "Lied Von Der Erde," or something by Morton Feldman. Somehow the complexity of the music merges with the focused intensity I'm putting into my work and my brain just feels alive, active, fully engaged in a way words cannot describe.

Also, the "Evening Music" programming has gotten a lot better. For about a week after the chageover it seemed like everything was on the "Four Seasons"/"Eine Kleine Nachtmusik" level and I feared the worst. Fortunately that did not come to pass.

Nov. 17 2009 08:25 PM

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