The "Glee" Effect

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Friday, January 28, 2011

Next week, the hit TV show "Glee" resumes new episodes. The show follows the makings of a high school show choir that sings everything from Frank Sinatra to Madonna. A few months ago, the music from the show broke a record set by The Beatles on the Billboard music charts, and this week they broke Elvis Prestley's record for 20 appearances in the top 40 charts. The show's popularity is bringing choral music back to the forefront—with pop music as the way in for many students.

In this week's Arts File, Kerry Nolan talks to Sanford Sardo, choral director at Calhoun High School in Long Island, and Gregg Breinberg, the director of the web-famous P.S. 22 chorus from Staten Island.

Check out videos of the P.S. 22 chorus (which will be singing at the Oscars ceremony in February), and Calhoun High School's show choir, "Crescendo" and let us know what you think in the comments section below!

 

Guests:

Gregg Breinberg and Sanford Sardo

Hosted by:

Kerry Nolan

Produced by:

Julia Furlan
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Comments [3]

MELISSA from staten island

I AM A PROUD MOTHER OF A CHILD IN PSS 22 CHORUS AND I WILL DEFINETELY BE WATCHING THE OSCARS IM VERY PROUD OF ALL CHORUS MEMBERS AS WELL AS MY SOON...

Feb. 04 2011 01:13 PM
Cherza Ghierlarj

I plan to watch the Oscars just so I can see the children perform. That will be the highlight of the show for me.

Jan. 30 2011 03:32 AM
Liz Arroya from Tarrytown, NY

It is just wonderful that music is finding its way back into the schools. For that alone Glee has been influential in a good way. Hopefully more schools start their own little chorus group and then maybe there can be annual competitions. Keep singing young ones.

Jan. 30 2011 03:28 AM

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