Doric String Quartet

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Monday, August 15, 2011

Doric String Quartet Doric String Quartet

On this week's performance from the Frick Collection, the London-based Doric String Quartet plays works by Haydn, Schubert and Korngold.

More about the Doric String Quartet:

Formed in 1998 at the Pro Corda, The National School for Young Chamber Music Players in Suffolk, England, the Doric String Quartet won its first competition two years later.  Since then, the group has added prizes in the Osaka International Chamber Music Competition in Japan, the Premio Paolo Borciani International String Quartet Competition in Italy, and the Ensemble Prize at the Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in Germany.

In addition to its own concerts, the quartet has collaborated with singers Mark Padmore and Ian Bostridge, pianists Julius Drake and Melvyn Tan, and the Leopold String Trio and the Florestan Trio. Recordings include CDs of the complete quartets by Erich Korngold and Walton Chandos.  In the 2010―11 season, the quartet toured Japan, New Zealand, and Australia, and will give concerts in England, the Netherlands, Germany, Hungary, and Israel.  The quartet is making its first United States tour in November with debuts at The Frick Collection and the Library of Congress.

Alex Redington, violin
Jonathan Stone, violin
Simon Tandree, viola
John Myerscough, cello

Playlist

Quartet in D Major, Op. 64, No. 5 “The Lark” (1790)

Franz Joseph Haydn (1732―1809)

Allegro moderato
Adagio cantabile
Menuetto (Allegretto)
Finale (Vivace)

Quartet in D Major, Op. 34, No. 3 (1945)

Erich Korngold (1897―1957)

Allegro moderato
Scherzo: allegro molto
Sostenuto (like a folk tune)
Finale: allegro con fuoco

INTERMISSION

Quartet No. 13 in A minor, D. 804, Op. 29 “Rosamunde” (1824)

Franz Schubert (1797―1828)

Allegro ma non troppo
Andante
Menuetto (Allegretto)
Allegro moderato

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