As Borders Closes, 400 Fewer Places to Buy Classical Music

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Friday, July 22, 2011

The Borders location at Penn Plaza is one of 399 remaining stores to close in the coming months. The Borders location at Penn Plaza is one of 399 remaining stores to close in the coming months. (wallyg/flickr/flickr)

The bookseller Borders could begin closing the doors of its 400 stores as early as Friday. The big box retailer filed for bankruptcy protection in February, following a years-long decline brought on by the growth of online book, music, and video sales, the e-reader market, and other factors. Borders was first-and-foremost a bookstore, but it also sold quite a bit of classical music to fans who liked to leaf through its collection of orchestral and chamber music, opera, concertos, choral music, and more. In this week's Arts File, Kerry Nolan speaks with NPR Music writer Anastasia Tsioulcas about what the Borders liquidation means for those who sell, distribute, and listen to classical music.

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Comments [3]

Jeffrey M. Shabman from Milwaukee, WI

I finally got disgusted with the whole retail store method which includes both Border's and Barnes & Noble. Everytime I specifically asked for an item it turned out that it would need to be special ordered.
Well, I could do that myself, and I do through Amazon.com.
Having the item arrive in your mailbox without the extra shipping charge from the store is a pleaasure.
I have nothing against retail stores and was saddened to learn about Border's demise, however, the retail game has to step up to the plate or step aside.

Aug. 04 2011 11:29 AM
Al Luna from Bronx, NY

J&R just reduced the space for classical music.
The B&N in CO-OP City did away with the music/DVD section (GONE!). Well, they only had one half a bin for classical music anyways. I went into that Borders, I saw the classical music section! It was 2 Rows on a bin!!!! Face it people, if it's too complicated, we NY'rs can't handle it. This is a groove city. But, hey, let's eliminate all kinds of music for the sake of diversity. The radio in NY used to be a world of diversity. Now the stations all sound alike. And the 14's to 25's do not listen to classical. Yes, I too have to make the trek to 17th Street or Brooklyn Bridge.

Aug. 01 2011 11:45 AM
GCL from Astoria Queens

I couldn't agree more. Tower Records was forced out of business by two activities. One was the beginning of the download directly to music players, that is iTunes for iPods. The other was the beginning of lesser places to buy music. It was also thought that the problems were also caused by the increasing business expenses.....

There is still JR, in its usual place, and even B&N has a good selection at its Union Square store.

Speaking of which, they are reacting to this store closing the same way we react to the passing of family, friends, and pets, and sometimes those people who're the cause of problems.

Jul. 24 2011 01:20 PM

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