Too Raucous for Radio?

Fireworks and Fairy Tales, Myths and Monsters

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Monday, July 25, 2011

There must be some deep-seated, funny, psychologically-sound logic behind the release of big-budget disaster films during the hottest months. For whatever reason, there seems no more appropriate course of action these days than watching explosions and zombie-slayings, riding roller coasters and eating absurd fried things. Summer is a season of excess, and this week’s show features bombastic, over-the-top, Micheal Bay-esque music.

This week will afford us the opportunity to play all manner of things often considered "too raucous for radio." We’ll hear from eccentric Icelandic-German-Swedish composer Jon Leifs who writes music evocative of natural disasters. We’ll hear music inspired by Greek myth (with omigod a giant ratchet) and music written as a surround-sound cautionary tale, warning of the excesses of the Roman Empire.

This week, tune in for fireworks and fairy tales, myths and monsters: it’s time for bombastic music on Q2! What’s your favorite totally over-the-top piece of music?

Check out composer John Corigliano introducing his massive concert band work Circus Maximus below!

Hosted by:

Nadia Sirota

Comments [4]

Andrew from Fairbanks, AK

This week's theme has been one of my absolute favorites. I was surprised that I own so much of these! And delighted to be introduced to many, many more. Thank you!!!
As for bombastic I'd have to go with Shostakovitch's Chamber Symphony op110. I know that's going pretty far back. Tristan Perich's 1-Bit Symphony is pretty intense. And Michael Gordon's Light is Calling is more over the top than Weather. My humble opinion. Keep it up!

Jul. 28 2011 03:18 PM
Silversalty from Brooklyn

Re: Summer blockbuster

I just happened to see something yesterday at Boingboing about the history of air conditioning and the "summer blockbuster".

http://www.slate.com/id/2299844/

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The big breakthrough, of course, was electricity. Nikola Tesla's development of alternating current motors made possible the invention of oscillating fans in the early 20th century. And in 1902, a 25-year-old engineer from New York named Willis Carrier invented the first modern air-conditioning system. The mechanical unit, which sent air through water-cooled coils, was not aimed at human comfort, however; it was designed to control humidity in the printing plant where he worked. In 1922, he followed up with the invention of the centrifugal chiller, which added a central compressor to reduce the unit's size. It was introduced to the public on Memorial Day weekend, 1925, when it debuted at the Rivoli Theater in Times Square. For years afterward, people piled into air-conditioned movie theaters on hot summer days, giving rise to the summer blockbuster.
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Via http://boingboing.net/2011/07/25/why-air-conditioning-is-to-blame-for-transformers-3.html

Regarding roller coasters, I think there's a similar mix with cooling, though natural cooling instead of artificial. Coney Island used to regularly get millions of people on the beach during hot summer days. But since the '50s, when air conditioning became cheap and portable enough for the masses, the need to seek seaside cooling has disappeared. Also, look at the architecture of large buildings since the '50s.

Jul. 26 2011 11:32 AM
Joseph Marcus from paris, france

When I first heard this work on Q2 I was riding the Metro in Paris. The music was cut off whenever the reception on my cell phone failed in the tunnels. Yet despite those interruptions, what I heard sufficed it to blow my mind and make me buy the CD. But seeing it performed by this wonderful youth orchestra only confirms that this work is a masterpiece!

Jul. 25 2011 06:44 PM
Joseph Marcus from paris, france

When I first heard this work on Q2 I was riding the Metro in Paris. The music was cut off whenever the reception on my cell phone failed in the tunnels. Yet despite those interruptions, what I heard sufficed it to blow my mind and make me buy the CD. But seeing it performed by this wondeful youth orchestra only confirms that this work is a masterpiece!

Jul. 25 2011 06:39 PM

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