Nareh Arghamanyan

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Monday, May 31, 2010

The Frick Collection Exterior: Seventieth Street Garden; The Frick Collection, New York The Frick Collection Exterior: Seventieth Street Garden; The Frick Collection, New York (Photo: Michael Bodycomb)

Born in Armenia in 1989, Nareh Arghamanyan began her piano studies in Yerevan.  At fifteen she was admitted to the University for Music and Performing Arts in Vienna. Beginning in 1997, she received international awards in France, Spain, Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Vienna, and in Salt Lake City in the United States.

First-prize winner of the 2008 Montreal International Music competition, she also received the Audience Choice Award and a special award for the best interpretation of a work by the Canadian composer Alexina Louie.  Ms. Arghamanyan has participated in the Marlboro Festival and in festivals in Germany, Canada, and France.  She has appeared with international orchestras and given recitals in many countries in Europe.  Her first recording, on the Analekta label, includes Rachmaninoff’s Sonata No. 2 and Liszt’s B Minor Sonata.  This season she will give recitals in San Francisco, Miami, Detroit, Minneapolis, and Kansas City among others.    This is Nareh Arghamanyan’s New York recital debut.

Playlist

Partita No. 3 in A minor, BWV 827 (1726)

Johann Sebastian Bach

Fantaisie
Allemande
Courante
Sarabande
Burlesca
Scherzo
Gigue

Humoreske in B-flat major, Op. 20 (1839)

Robert Schumann (1810–1856)

Einfach; sehr rasch und leicht
Hastig
Einfach und zart; Intermezzo

Innig

Sehr lebhaft; mit einigen Pomp Zum Beschluss; Allegro

INTERMISSION

Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110 (1821)

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827)

Moderato cantabile molto espressivo
Allegro molto
Adagio ma non troppo – Allegro ma non troppo (Fuga)

Ballade No. 2 in B minor, S. 171 (1853)

Franz Liszt (1811–1886)

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