Jerry Goldsmith in the '70s

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Saturday, October 01, 2011

Composer Jerry Goldsmith brought a 20th-century sensibility to film scoring, making compelling use of dissonance and imaginative orchestrations. He also had a great ear for gentle, touching lyricism and a knack for combining edgy harmonies and lyricism into something unique and thrilling. Goldsmith began his influential scoring career in the 1950s and continued into the 21st Century.

This week, host David Garland concentrates on Goldsmith's work from the 1970s, including scores for "Star Trek the Motion Picture," "Chinatown," "The Omen," "Patton," "Logan's Run," "Alien," "The Homecoming" and others.

Playlist

Jerry Goldsmith - Star Trek the Motion Picture (1979) - Main Title, Klingon Battle - Columbia

Jerry Goldsmith - The Omen (1976) - Ave Satani - Varese Sarabande

Jerry Goldsmith - The Homecoming (1971) - A Serious Matter, Growing Pains - Film Score Monthly

Jerry Goldsmith - Islands in the Stream (1976) - I Can't Have Him - Film Score Monthly

Jerry Goldsmith - Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971) - The Gorilla Attack, Breakout - Varese Sarabande

Jerry Goldsmith - The Mephisto Waltz (1971) - Main Title - Varese Sarabande

Jerry Goldsmith - Papillon (1973) - Catching Butterflies

Jerry Goldsmith - One Little Indian (1973) - Camel Trouble - Intrada

Jerry Goldsmith - Take a Hard Ride (1975) - The Hunter - Film Score Monthly

Jerry Goldsmith - Magic (1978) - Main Title - Varese Sarabande

Jerry Goldsmith - Chinatown (1975) - Love Theme From Chinatown, Noah Cross - Varese Sarabande

Jerry Goldsmith - Patton (1970) - Main Title - Intrada

Jerry Goldsmith - Logan's Run (1976) - Flameout - Film Score Monthly

Jerry Goldsmith - Alien (1979) - Parker's Death - Intrada

Jerry Goldsmith - The Great Train Robbery (1979) - End Title - Memoir

Jerry Goldsmith - The Boys from Brazil (1978) - Old Photos - Intrada

Jerry Goldsmith - "Chinatown" Interview


"Logan's Run" trailer

"The Homecoming" trailer

Comments [6]

so gifted and so missed. I am amazed that lovers of classical music eschew this modern genius. Were they contemporaries, the great composers would have been lining up to score films.

Oct. 13 2011 05:12 PM
ardath_bey

His most brilliant in my view is Poltergeist which was done in 1982, so not part of this show. I love his music and listen to it constantly, I made a selection of his best for my iPod, here's my list:

Omen III - Main Title
The Omen - The Dog's Attack
Poltergeist - It Knows What Scares You
Poltergeist - Rebirth
Legend - Main Title / The Goblins
Star Trek - Ilia's Theme
Air Force One - Title
L.A. Confidential - Bloody Xmas
Under Fire - Bajo Fuego
Planet of the Apes - Main Title
Patton - Main Title
The Swarm - Bees Arrive
Cassandra Crossing - Break-In
Capricorn One - Title
Chinatown - J.J. Gittes
First Knight - Arthur's Farewell
Powder - Theme
Star Trek: Voyager
Star Trek: First Contact

Oct. 12 2011 12:49 PM
Stephanie J. Hughes from Manchester, NJ

What a wonderful show! Jerry Goldsmith was a true treasure, someone whose music I just loved. When we lost him - and, ironically, Elmer Bernstein at practically the same time! - we lost the last of the great filmscore artists. Literally. There are only one or two left that can hold a baton to these great men. Wish you had included "Wind and the Lion," but next time! I loved the show!

Oct. 02 2011 07:30 PM
Roland

No show can be complete without some Tora! Tora! Tora!. But this is a great selection none the less. Jerry Goldsmith through the ages has some incredible scores. My personal favorite is Air Force One. Radek is Free is one of the best Russian themes for cinema and, in my opinion, his best theme.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMTR_K3wajc

Oct. 01 2011 05:01 PM

The score of "Patton" is one of my favorites. It was so unexpected. In place of the typical loud and pounding music usually accompanying a military movie, it was deeper and delicate, especially Patton's motif as when he spoke about being in ancient battles and other pensive scenes.

The music reflected Patton, the anachronistic hero, and less the war in which the movie takes place, which it could have easily been - obvious and routine.

Fortunately, this nuanced score is the work of a particularly insightful and sensitive composer.

Oct. 01 2011 02:14 PM
Bob from LI, NY

Growing up with these movies, I am really looking forward to tonight's show. I didn't realize the diversity of movies he scored.

Oct. 01 2011 12:23 PM

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