Judge Judith Kaye's Passion for Opera

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Sunday, November 06, 2011

As an attorney, Judith Kaye was a trailblazer, and the first woman to become a partner in the distinguished law firm where she worked. Kaye then became the first woman appointed as the Chief Judge of the State of New York where she ruled for more than 15 years. Returning to private practice, she has also joined the Board of Lincoln Center.

In a wide-ranging discussion with host Gilbert Kaplan, she reveals:

• Why opera is her consuming passion.

• Her risky adventure going to the Bayreuth Wagner Festival without a ticket.

• Her musical fantasy? To be a diva: “I want to be Renee Fleming.”

• Thinking about whether she ought to listen to more contemporary music, she quotes ice hockey star Wayne Gretzky: “I want to skate where the puck is going to be.”

Program Playlist:

Giacomo Puccini: Turandot “Signore, Ascolta!” [excerpt]. Orchestra dell’Accademia di Santa Cecilia. Alberto Erede. Renata Tebaldi, soprano. Decca 452 964-2.

Giacomo Puccini: Tosca. Conclusion. Orchestra e Coro del Teatro alla Scala. Victor de Sabata. Maria Callas, soprano. EMI Classics 56304.

Richard Wagner: Die Walküre “Wotan’s Farewell” [excerpt]. Vienna Philharmonic. Sir Georg Solti. Hans Hotter, baritone. London 414 105-2.

Charles Gounod: Roméo et Juliette “Ah! Tu dis vrai”. Orchestra & Chorus du Capitole de Toulouse. Michel Plasson. Roberto Alagna, tenor. Angela Gheorghiu, soprano. EMI Classics 7243 5 56123 2 8.

Andrew Lloyd Weber: Aspects of Love “Love Changes Everything”. Michael Ball. Polydor 31453 3064 2.

Charles Gounod: Faust “Marguerite’s Spinning Song.” Symphonie-Orchester & Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks. Sir Colin Davis. Kiri Te Kanawa, soprano. Philips 475 7769.

 

Guests:

Judge Judith Kaye
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Comments [1]

Anthony Peterson from Former NYer

I want to c an honest critique of her time as top judge. It seems no one has been allowed to point by point evaluate her performance, positions nor the un intended results of her administrative decisions. I see this absence of public scrutiny as censorship. If President Clinton considered her as candidate for a top spot in his administration one has to wonder what other considerations offered to her that couldve shaped her positions while in her NY post.

Feb. 22 2013 10:33 PM

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