A Choral Thanksgiving

A feast of listener request

« previous episode | next episode »

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Thanksgiving may be over, but not on The Choral Mix. On this week's show we give thanks to great choral music and Kent Tritle features requests by listeners in thanks for their support. We hear works by Bach, Brahms and Pärt, among others.

Most fitting for our Thanksgiving choral feast, we hear Johann Sebastian Bach's Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele (Praise the Lord, my soul). The work was composed in 1723, during Bach's first year in Leipzig. Scored for orchestra, chorus and soloists, the joyous work draws on text from Psalm 103:2: "Praise the Lord, my soul, and do not forget the good He has done for you." A master of text painting, Bach employs a double fugue in order to project the duplicity of the Psalm. We hear the work performed by the Hilliard Ensemble and London Baroque under the direction of Paul Hillier and Heinz Hennig.

Also this week, we hear your personal requests of music by Barber, Vaughan Williams and much more.

Playlist:

Bach/Bach Motets/ The Hilliard Ensemble, Knabenchor Hannover, London Baroque, Paul Hillier and Heinz Hennig

Track 25-27    Lobet den Herrn 6.33

 

Brahms/ Geistliche Chormusik/ RIAS-Kammerchor, Marcus Creed

           Track 2            O Heiland, Reis 5.21

 

 

Pärt/ Te Deum/ Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Tallin Chamber Orchestra, Tönu Kaljuste

Track 1            Te Deum 28.45

 

 

Barber/Choral and Organ Works/Cambridge University Chamber Choir, Timothy Brown

 

Track 15          To be sung on the water 2.27

Track 3            The Coolin 3.19

 

Thompson/ Frostiana/ Exultate

Track 6            Stopping by the woods 4.12

 

 

 

Vaughan Williams/ Coronation of H.M. Queen Elizabeth II/ Westminster Abbey Choir, The English Chamber Orchestra, London Brass, Martin Neary

 

Track 9 Old Hundredth, “All people that on Earth do Dwell” 4.52

The WQXR e-newsletter. Show highlights, links to music news, on-demand concerts, events from The Greene Space and more.

Comments [9]

Stephen J. Herschkorn from Highland Park, N.J.

Thanks for playing three of my suggestions (from last month), Kent! I prefer more gentle performances of both Barber pieces, though. Check out the recordings by Bruffy leading the KC Chorale (_Fern Hill_) and Broadbent leading The Joyful Company of Singers (Barber and Schuman).

Nov. 28 2011 01:07 AM
Kevin from TN

Is there any way to get a program list for the "A Choral Thanksgiving." I missed part of it plus haven't been writing the composers/works as they have been listed. Several of these works are ones I have never heard before. Thank you for your time! (great program by the way!)

Nov. 27 2011 11:48 PM
Stephen J. Herschkorn from Highland Park, NJ

dhanotte- The Brahms was "O Heiland reiß die Himmel auf."

Angelina- The Estonian piece was Pärt's _Te Deum_.

Nov. 27 2011 11:33 PM
Angelina from Manhattan, NYC

Kent, Please tell me the name of the piece you played after 7am that was sung by an Estonian choral group and which was other worldly. Many thanks for sharing it with us.

Nov. 27 2011 09:55 PM
Michael Meltzer

Today's program was like a nostalgiac visit with some treasured old friends. Many thanks.

Nov. 27 2011 02:25 PM
Nick Isabella

I would like to know the name of the second to the last piece played this morning. thanks

Nov. 27 2011 08:39 AM
Gary from Manhattan NYC

Randall Thompson's "Stopping by Woods on a Snow Evening" - absolutely sublime, especially for this New Hampshire boy. The perfect piece as we head into winter.

Nov. 27 2011 07:56 AM

Kent: I didn't catch the name of that incredible Brahms piece. Please tell us what it is? Thanks!

Nov. 27 2011 07:51 AM
Michael Meltzer

As Kent correctly anounced, we heard Bach Motet #6, which is "Lobet den Herrn alle Heiden," BWV 230, NOT the "Lobe den Herrn meine Seele" WQXR has printed above, which is Cantata #143 (BWV143).

Nov. 27 2011 07:31 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.