Nashville Symphony Goes Electric With Violinist Tracy Silverman

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Saturday, May 12, 2012

The Nashville Symphony arrives with Nashville-based electric violinist Tracy Silverman, the featured soloist on a new piece written for him by Terry Riley. In addition, the orchestra will perform the New York premiere of Charles Ives's monumental Universe Symphony (Austin realization). Elliott Forrest and David Garland host the program.

Nashville Symphony
Giancarlo Guerrero, Music Director
Tracy Silverman, Electric Violin
IVES: Universe Symphony (as realized and completed by Larry Austin) (New York Premiere)
TERRY RILEY: The Palmian Chord Ryddle for Electric Violin and Orchestra (New York Premiere)
GRAINGER: The Warriors

ENCORE: Roberto Sierra: Symphony No. 4, Fourth Movement

Below is the archive of our live chat from Saturday's broadcast:

In this video, Gary from the Nashville Symphony talks about the technical challenges of Ives's Universe Symphony (including five different conductors and 14 different click-tracks):


Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Hosts Elliott Forrest and David Garland with producer Eileen Delahunty going over the script before the final Spring For Music live broadcast.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Nashville Symphony fans show their support as the orchestra takes the stage.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Each of the six Spring For Music symphonies had its own color of bandana to give to fans who'd come from their home town for the performance.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
The Nashville Symphony's been thoroughly documenting its trip to Carnegie Hall.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Host Elliott Forrest with composer Terry Riley. The Nashville Symphony performed the New York premiere of Riley's 'The Palmian Chord Ryddle for Electric Violin and Orchestra.'

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Comments [4]

David Jaeger from Toronto

Thank you WQXR for a wonderful week of live concerts!

The repertoire was stimulating, the performances were just great & the recordings & on-air presentation were wonderful!!!

Keep it up - you are doing the Musical World a great service!!!!

Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU,
David Jaeger
Toronto

May. 13 2012 01:13 AM
Michael Shaffer

First of all: Nashville Symphony and WQXR needs to stop listing the Ives piece as a NY premiere, which it is not -- the communications director said it was an oversight that they did not make it clear that it was the Austin rather than the far superior realization done by Johnny Reinhard and the American Festival of Microtonal music that premiered at Alice Tully Hall in 1996 -- which had no click tracks in it and was performed by 2 conductors -- this is not the space for a long discussion on this but credit should be given where credit is due, otherwise it's just musical politics...

May. 12 2012 05:28 PM
Michael Shaffer from St. Simons Island, GA

First of all: Nashville Symphony and WQXR needs to stop listing the Ives piece as a NY premiere, which it is not -- the communications director said it was an oversight that they did not make it clear that it was the Austin rather than the far superior realization done by Johnny Reinhard and the American Festival of Microtonal music that premiered at Alice Tully Hall in 1996 -- which had no click tracks in it and was performed by 2 conductors -- this is not the space for a long discussion on this but credit should be given where credit is due, otherwise it's just musical politics...

May. 12 2012 05:26 PM
Frank Pugliese from Houston

Heard this concert Thursday in Houston...Mikhail Svetlov pours himself into the characters he portrays. This short piece is an incredible eye opener of
Stalin's threats to Russian composers. Bravo Shostakovich for lampooning the bureaucrats and Bravo Hans Graf for bringing it to Houston.

May. 05 2012 11:25 AM

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