May the Ninth Be With You

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Wednesday, May 09, 2012

This past Friday, May 4, Star Wars fans were having their fun saying "May the fourth be with you," and today, May 9, we're asking you pick the best of the Ninths on the ninth.

Is it Schubert, Dvorak or Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 that you prefer? You chose Dvorak's Ninth Symphony and we played it at noon.

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Comments [38]

Constantine from New York

Although I love Dvorak, I don't think the 9th takes a high place among his works. The Schubert is a lovely work, but Beethoven's is the only contender as far as I'm concerned.

May. 09 2012 04:19 PM
Jude from New York

This has become the greatest Wednesday ever, thank you!!!!

May. 09 2012 12:48 PM

Frank from LES
I couldn't agree more. The programing here has become so depressing for me.

May. 09 2012 12:31 PM
ramondo from manhattan

enjoy your dvorak, i'm tuning out.

May. 09 2012 12:05 PM

Play the Titan!!!! Play Beethoven's Ninth Symphony!!!! Thank you.

May. 09 2012 11:57 AM
Neil Myers from Yonkers, NY

Dvorak! I expect Beethoven to win though, as his 9th always seems to be the most popular with WQXR's listeners.

Dvorak's 9th is a wonder...and inspired by his visit to the USA

May. 09 2012 11:53 AM
ramon from manhattan

beethoven would uplift anyone with a heart or a brain through this dreary weather we're having, and the till fellner bach rendition currently being played is just a prelude to the 9th.

May. 09 2012 11:52 AM
Deb Un from NY, NY

Beethoven is my vote.

May. 09 2012 11:51 AM
Stein from norwalk,ct.

Beethoven's 9th. The other are Very good. Beethoven's 9th one of the top three pieces ever written.

May. 09 2012 11:43 AM
Richard Lushington from Flushing, NY

Many thanks for the wonderful music!!! It was Dvorak music that inspired me to continue my piano studies.
Best regars,
Richard "corazon-de-leon" Lushington
LUV YA

May. 09 2012 11:42 AM
Phyllis Landis from Taos, NM

I Love You. Scubert's 9th is my vote. Is this where I vote?

May. 09 2012 11:37 AM
L. Lubin from Fort Lee, NJ

These decisions would be so much easier if you told which performance you intend to play! But nothing clears the skies like the Beethoven. When I was a music student in the distant past, we turned the speakers out the dorm window during a thunderstorm, the old Schmidt-Isserstedt recording with Sutherland, Horne, King and Talvela. As the fourth movement began the clouds slowly began to part and blue skies and sunbeams showed through. A student in the quad who had been listening shouted "God one, God!" We shouted "Amen and Beethoven, too!"

May. 09 2012 11:33 AM
vilma chantiles

I want to vote for Dvorak's Ninth, but sorry, cannot find your voting booth.
Thanks for the superb music.

May. 09 2012 11:31 AM
Tanya from Andover

Go Ludwig Van!

May. 09 2012 11:29 AM
Raymond Banacki from Brooklyn, New York

Is "Beethoven's Ninth Symphony" the greatest piece of music that's ever been written? Well, that is the opinion of an awful lot of people. So, if it isn't, it comes pretty close, doesn't it? Of course, the absolutely amazing thing is that Beethoven himself was totally deaf when he wrote this world-famous piece. And he brought "voices" into instrumentation, too. What a piece of musical majesty for "noontime magic" on a gloomy, rainy Wednesday.

May. 09 2012 11:28 AM
Judith

Most definitely, Schubert. First, because it's Schubert, and second, because we need Schubert to lighten today's rainy gloom.

May. 09 2012 11:23 AM
marilyn

I voted earlier today for Beethoven by clicking on the blue bar. I'm not sure if the vote was tallied because the last time that I voted on something, I believe a notice popped up indicating that the vote was accepted. I dare not try to vote again in the event that my earlier vote actually was tallied. The other composers are great, too, but Beethoven is BEETHOVEN, after all.

May. 09 2012 11:15 AM
JEFF PIEGARI from Geensboro NC

Beethoven please. It's in a class by itself. IT HAS THE FAMOUS ODE TO JOY IN THE LAST MOVEMENT

May. 09 2012 11:07 AM
ABE BROOK from PISCATAWAY, NJ

THE SCHUBERT!! THE GEORGE SZELL, CLEVELAND RECORDING WAS THE BEST.

May. 09 2012 10:57 AM
Deborah Jackson from Park Slope, Brooklyn

I vote for Dvoràk. He never ceases to astound me with the diversity of his body of work. Each and every composition touches the most human and personal aspects of ourselves. His Symphony # 9 is magical.

May. 09 2012 10:49 AM

Why choose? I want all three. Add in Bruckner, Mahler and Shostakovich's 9th symphonies and you'd make my day!

May. 09 2012 10:42 AM
Richard from Red Bank, NJ

Beethoven please. It's in a class by itself.

May. 09 2012 10:40 AM
Carol Luparella from Elmwood Park, NJ

I would prefer to hear the Bruckner Ninth, but since it is not one of the choices, I voted for Beethoven. Would it really be so difficult for you to occasionally play Bruckner's music? It is a shame that it is so unfairly neglected.

May. 09 2012 10:37 AM
Harrietb98 from Bayside, NY

Although I love all 3 of them, I want to hear the Dvorak today.

May. 09 2012 10:22 AM
Steve from Westfield NJ

The Great Symphony is not called "great" for nothing. I go with Schubert

May. 09 2012 10:12 AM
Carolann Nexon from Denville,NJ

I've sung the Beethoven twice and it's a thrilling work, but today I'm in the mood for Dvorak. I adore the way it ends with a diminuendo!

May. 09 2012 10:08 AM
BarbaraLea from Hillsdale, NJ

Dvorak, please. It's such a beautiful piece.

May. 09 2012 09:57 AM
Suzanne Ruttenberg from New York, NY

It's Luddy for me. My classical music teeth were cut on all 9 symphonies and I will be forever grateful. The 9th lifts my spirits and compels me to "conduct" in the privacy of my room. Oh, the joy!

May. 09 2012 09:55 AM
emily from New York

Beethoven all the way. Must hear his "alle menchen...". Thank you.

May. 09 2012 09:54 AM
Sheldon hoffman from Woodmere

I'm a great fan of Ludwig but I don't get to hear Dvorak as much. I say we Showdown with Dvorak, listen to Brahms at 2pm and cap off the 3 o'clock hour with Beethoven's 9th. Oh what a glorious day that would be!

May. 09 2012 09:52 AM
Eduardo Weinschelbaum from Short Hills, NJ

It's a no-contest matter. Schubert's and Dvorak's are beautiful, but Beethoven's is the definition of symphony.

May. 09 2012 09:51 AM
mira barelli from NYC

Paint the town "red": BEETHOVEN!

May. 09 2012 09:12 AM
John J. Christiano from Franklin NJ

Nothing....Nothing....can lift you out of your chair and get your heart racing like Beethoven's Ninth.

I hear that last movement and get the urge to invade a small country!!!

Give me Ludwig!

May. 09 2012 08:27 AM
Howard Harner from Kulpsville, PA

I first heard the Schubert 9th when it was the 7th and still think it's the best of the bunch.

May. 09 2012 08:06 AM
Richard from Laurel Springs, NJ

Beethoven's 9th is great but I have to say I like Dvorak's 9th, From The New World, better. The second movement is just so beautiful. It is a great piece of music, the 2nd movement, to just to empty my mind of what is going on in this world. This section is just so peaceful and calming.

May. 09 2012 08:00 AM
Andrew Barnard from Leola, PA

If the 9th is the epitome of all music, how could it be overexposed?

Let's hear the Beethoven.

May. 09 2012 07:36 AM
Frank from LES

Marcelo, true, but it's also overexposed. So is the Dvorak. What about Bruckner's Ninth? Or how about Vaughan Williams or Roy Harris? Even Mahler's is not quite so obvious. This is another case of classical radio going down the "top 40" route in an effort to pander to listeners.

May. 09 2012 07:24 AM
Marcelo from Puerto Rico

LvB's ninth is the epitome of music, the pinnacle of art, the highest achievement of humankind.

May. 09 2012 07:08 AM

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