New York Philharmonic in Van Cortlandt Park

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Thursday, July 19, 2012

The Philharmonic heads to the boogie-down Bronx for the second installment of its summer parks series. 

The program, recorded on July 17 and conducted by Andrey Boreyko, features Wagner's Prelude to Act I of Die Meistersinger Von Nürnberg, Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto (featuring the dynamic James Ehnes as soloist) and Brahms's Symphony No. 1.

The broadcast starts at 8 pm. Naomi Lewin and Elliott Forrest host.

Kim Nowacki/WQXR
The New York Philharmonic at Van Courtlandt Park in the Bronx on July 17, 2012.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
WQXR's Margaret Kelley asks concert-goers, 'What's in your picnic basket?'
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
'What's in your picnic basket?'
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
'What's in your picnic basket?'
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
After taking a hiatus in 2011, the New York Philharmonic is back with its annual summer tour of New York City's parks.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Despite the heat, concert-goers enjoy dinner in the park.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
'What's in your picnic basket?'
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Andrey Boreyko leads the New York Philharmonic in Wagner's prelude to Act 1 of 'Die Meistersinger.'
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Andrey Boreyko leads the New York Philharmonic in Wagner's prelude to Act 1 of 'Die Meistersinger.'
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Conductor Andrey Boreyko.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Conductor Andrey Boreyko.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Violinist James Ehnes joins the orchestra for Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D major.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Violinist James Ehnes joins the orchestra for Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D major.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
Violinist James Ehnes joins the orchestra for Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D major.
Kim Nowacki/WQXR
WQXR's Naomi Lewin is one of the broadcast's hosts.

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Comments [4]

Les from Miami, Florida

Throughout the concert, I was struck by how realistic the sound quality was. I could hear details such as the trill on the bass tuba along with the bassoons, 'cellos and basses in the Meistersinger Prelude, the mute that Mr. Ehnes used in the second movement of the Tchaikovsky concerto (that many soloists don't use) and the contrabassoon in the brass choir of the Coda of the Brahms First Symphony. The seating plan with split violins really allows clarity to reign and the artistry of Mr. Boreyko and the Orchestra to manifest themselves. Thanks to all for this On Demand concert.

Jul. 21 2012 05:57 AM
Carol Luparella from Elmwood Park, NJ

What a great concert! Thank you, WQXR, for broadcasting it!

Jul. 19 2012 09:57 PM
cynthia nidd from Uxbridge, Ontario

What a marvelous concert. I liked the pictures. Thanks to my son, who saw the concert live, for telling me to listen in. I plan to listen to more concerts. I am north of Toronto, Ont. Canada.

Jul. 19 2012 08:51 PM
yichihara from NJ

I was thrilled to learn that James Ehnes was playing LIVE here in New York City with NY Phil. Although I missed a chance going to the Park concerts, luckily I am listening the live recording now.

A couple of years ago when I was listening to WQXR, I was stunned by his playing Samuel Barber Violin concerto. To me it was the most beautiful, lyrical Barber’s violin concerto I had heard ever. I did not know who’s playing, but was compelled to find out who it was. I checked WQXR playlist and learned that it was James Ehnes. Then lot long after that, I was again impressed his playing Saint-Saens Violin Concerto on WQXR. His lyricism is extraordinary among the violin virtuosos alive today, and it makes me keep my eye (ear) on him.

Jul. 19 2012 08:34 PM

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