Verdi's Simon Boccanegra

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Saturday, August 04, 2012

Placido Domingo, the LA Opera's general director, sings the title role in Verdi's tale of a tormented doge in 14th-century Genoa. Here the 71-year-old tenor takes on a baritone role that has become a calling card in recent seasons.

Playing Boccanegra's long-lost daughter Amelia, who has fallen in love with her father's political rival, is the Puerto Rican soprano Ana María Martínez. Paolo Gavanelli is the villain who tries to abduct Amelia and eventually kills Simon. Ukranian baritone Vitalij Kowaljow is Fiesco, who raised Amelia without knowing he's actually her grandfather.

James Conlon conducts this production by Elijah Moshinsky.

CAST:
Simon Boccanegra: Placido Domingo
Amelia: Ana Maria Martinez
Jacopo Fiesco: Vitalij Kowaljow
Gabriele Adorno: Stefano Secco
Paolo Albiani: Paolo Gavanelli
Pietro: Robert Pomakov

CONDUCTOR:  James Conlon
STAGE DIRECTOR:  Elijah Moshinsky
LA OPERA ORCHESTRA & CHORUS
ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR & CHORUS MASTER: Grant Gershon

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Comments [3]

tony lamberti from new haven,ct.

n/a

Aug. 05 2012 02:49 PM
larry eisenberg from new york city

Verdi's Boccanegra? A treat!
With wonderful music replete,
Fiesco's lament
This list'ner's heart rent,
And Placido makes it complete!

Aug. 04 2012 01:48 PM
Lucille R. Falcone from New York, NY

This is the first time I have heard Verdi's Simon Boccanegra. The music and singing are sublime. I am sorry to have missed it at the Metropolitan Opera.

Aug. 04 2012 01:46 PM

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