Family Trees

These episodes first streamed the week of May 7, 2012

« previous episode | next episode »

Monday, August 13, 2012

START STREAMING Q2 MUSIC NOW

Did you know that Stephen Sondheim was a pupil of Milton Babbitt? Or that John Cage studied with Arnold Schoenberg? This week on Hammered! we tease out the often unexpected musical relationships between some of the century's greatest pedagogues and their students.

Take, for instance, the extraordinary breadth of Milton Babbitt's pedagogical influence. Over the course of his lengthy and inspired teaching career, which included stints at Princeton University and The Juilliard School in addition to being one of the foremost musical theorist of the 20th century, he taught a staggering range of composers. Stephen Sondheim, sure, but also consider the variety of styles represented by Donald Martino, Paul Lansky, Kati Agocs and David Rakowski.

We'll also hear music from two of his youngest students from Juilliard, Wei-Cheih Lin and Nathan Shields, who wrote a beautiful memoriam for Babbitt shortly after his passing in January 2011.

But that's all just Monday -- each day we'll focus on a different composer-teacher. Wednesday, for instance, you'll hear music of the legendary Nadia Boulanger and students Aaron Copland, Arthur Berger (an incredible Duo for cello and piano, a rare Hammered! exception), George Antheil and ... wait for it ... Philip Glass! In another rich hour of music on Thursday we connect the musical dots between Olivier Messiaen and a handful of his often equally influential students, including Tristan Murail, Pierre Boulez and George Benjamin

Hosted by:

Conor Hanick
The WQXR e-newsletter. Show highlights, links to music news, on-demand concerts, events from The Greene Space and more.

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.