Mahan Esfahani Plays Bach, Byrd, Scarlatti and Powell

« previous episode | next episode »

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Iranian-American harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani performs at the Frick Collection, where such luminaries as Wanda Landowska and Ralph Kirkpatrick performed some of the first widely-received harpsichord recitals in the U.S. His solo recital features works by William Byrd, Johann Sebastian Bach, Domenico Scarlatti and Mel Powell.

Esfahani was the first harpsichordist to be named a BBC New Generation Artist and the first to be awarded a fellowship prize by the Borletti-Buitoni Trust.

The WQXR e-newsletter. Show highlights, links to music news, on-demand concerts, events from The Greene Space and more.

Comments [3]

andre cadet from NYC

Sir/Ms: On Sunday past you played The Sonata #3 by Chopin from the Frick collection--the pianist was Benjamin Grosvenor. Sadly I can't locate this CD for purchase. Please help!!! Also, I just returned from the Aspen Music Festival where he was playing; he played "live" Morton Gould's "Boogie Woogie Etude." Is this available? This young man is one in ten million!!! Thank you, Sincerely, Andre cadet

Aug. 30 2012 06:20 PM
Donald from Worcester, MA

Wonderful playing- I love his agogic accents, and his virtuosity. I wonder why in his interview Esfahani beats the old dead horse of boring, "musicological", historical performance?? Who is he talking about? Landowska? Kirkpatrick? Good ol' Luciano Scrizzi? Harnoncourt? Leonhardt??? Hogwood? Gardner? (etc, etc, I am mentioning the oder generations of performers in the historical style.) The boring stuff was the semi-baroque guys like I Musici who played the sewing machine music. That's so 1950's!!!

Aug. 26 2012 11:03 PM
Judith

what kind of harpsichord is Esfahani playing? It sounds (on the broadcast, anyway) like one of the big, iron-framed ones that Landowska played. (this is not a compaint, just a query....)

Aug. 26 2012 09:46 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.