Haunting Soundtracks Part 2: Monsters We Love

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Saturday, October 13, 2012

Creatures from outer space and the Black Lagoon! Werewolves! Giant apes, giant spiders, and humongous radioactive dinosaurs! These are some of the monsters we love, even if the love isn't reciprocated.

Throughout October, the spookiest month, David Garland presents an intriguing range of music from horror, sci-fi and fantasy films. Resourceful composers have found many different ways to chill spines, evoke thrills, be seductively scary, and get on your nerves. Tonight, monster music by Max Steiner, Akira Ifukube, Hans J. Salter & Frank Skinner, Paul Sawtell & Bert Shefter and many others.

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Comments [3]

David Schecter from California

David -- we should talk again one of these days. We've been releasing so many classic monster/horror soundtracks on our CD label over the last few years I could talk for weeks!

David Schecter
Monstrous Movie Music
http://www.mmmrecordings.com

Mar. 26 2013 04:58 PM
Reeldigger

The Swan Lake theme as a horror movie main title goes back to the 1931 Bela Lugosi "Dracula." The same year Paramount made excellent use of Bach's Toccata and Fugue to open their version of "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" with Frederic March.

I never spotted any classical musical sources in the Val Lewton films but Universal's 1934 "The Black Cat" (with Karloff and Lugosi) featured a wall-to-wall musical score, around 90% was classical. It's a fun listening experience with generous servings of transcribed Lizst plus Beethoven, Schubert, Bach, etc. I believe the entire film is available on YouTube.

Oct. 14 2012 10:59 PM

The beautiful "Swan Lake" became ominous when used in the original "Mummy" with Boris Karloff. Other classical pieces were used in some of the movies by Val Lewton amongst others. Finally, how many of us were introduced to "Der Zauberlehrling" ["The Sorcerer's Apprentice"] by Paul Dukas in the feature-length cartoon "Fantasia," that had more than a small touch of horror to it? Movies that were terrifying but terrific!

Oct. 13 2012 02:06 AM

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