Stravinsky and Françaix

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Sunday, December 09, 2012

The lives of Russian Igor Stravinsky and the Frenchman JeanFrançaix overlapped in France during the 1920s and '30s before Stravinsky moved to America. Françaix was born just as Stravinsky was making musical history with his then-scandalous ballet music for the Rite of Spring, and as a student Françaix was undoubtedly influenced by the famous and controversial Russian, says David Finckel, Chamber Music Society co-artistic director.

Françaix remained, however, steadfastly French, while Stravinsky explored many idioms. This week's program features two Stravinsky favorites, the Suite from “L’Histoire du Soldat” and the “Dumbarton Oaks Concerto,” plus a trio and a quintet by Françaix.

Program details:

Jean Françaix: Trio for Violin, Viola, and Cello
— Yura Lee, violin; Richard O'Neill, viola; Jakob Koranyi, cello.

Igor Stravinsky: Suite from Histoire du soldat for Violin, Clarinet, and Piano
— Ida Kavafian, violin; Jose Franch-Ballester, clarinet; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano.

Jean Françaix: Quintet No. 1 for Flute, Violin, Viola, Cello, and Harp
— Sooyun Kim, flute; Kristin Lee, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Nicholas Canellakis, cello; Bridget Kibbey, harp.

Igor Stravinsky: Concerto in E-flat major for Chamber Orchestra, "Dumbarton Oaks"
— Todd Phillips, Ida Kavafian, Daniel Phillips, violin; Steven Tenenbom, Mark Holloway, Richard O'Neill, viola; Timothy Eddy, Dane Johansen, cello; Timothy Cobb, Kurt Muroki, contrabass; Sooyun Kim, flute; Jose Franch-Ballester, clarinet; Milan Turkovic, bassoon; William Purvis, Alana Vegter, horn.

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