Brooklyn Philharmonic Chief to Run New Jersey Symphony

Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 12:00 AM

While the Nets said goodbye to New Jersey for a new arena in Brooklyn this fall, a Brooklyn orchestra manager is planning to add a Garden State orchestra to his resume – and keep his current job.

Brooklyn Philharmonic CEO Richard Dare will become the president and CEO of the New Jersey Symphony, the Newark-based orchestra said on Tuesday. He is to start the new job on January 2.

In an e-mail, Dare said he has no plans to leave his current post in Brooklyn. "Fortunately both organizations have been enormously generous toward one another and toward me, allowing me to begin leading the NJSO while not disrupting the Brooklyn Phil either," he said. "So it's full steam ahead with both."

Dare arrived in Brooklyn in 2011 after spending the better part of the past decade as international investment strategist. He has sought to reboot an orchestra that had been dormant, out of funds and without a concert hall. One of his main accomplishments, with music director Alan Pierson, has been to develop concert and education series in far-flung Brooklyn neighborhoods, including Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brighton Beach and Downtown. In similar fashion, the New Jersey Symphony tours to several communities across the Garden State.

Dare has attracted attention beyond the world of orchestra management; his columns for the Huffington Post have featured a no-holds-barred commentary on issues like concert etiquette and the role of unions. His article "The Awfulness of Classical Music Explained," argued that audiences are stifled by ritual and afraid of clapping between movements (he spoke about it on a June episode of WQXR’s Conducting Business).

“Richard brings an unparalleled business sense and a keen and inquisitive mind, as well as an entrepreneurial nature and a deep love of music, to our organization,” said NJSO board of trustees co-chairs Ruth C. Lipper and Stephen Sichak Jr., in a joint statement.

Dare replaces André Gremillet, who left in July to become managing director of the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra in Australia.

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Comments [1]

Elizabeth D. Ames, MD from Norwood, NJ

No, I don't think audiences should "clap whenever they "want." The truth is, those who grew up with classical music don't "want" to clap between movements. Those who didn't simply don't know that is the custom, but they learn fast enough. It is not a custom for stodgy custom's sake. Clapping disturbs the flow of the music which reaches people in a deeply spiritual way. People would not clap during a slight pause during a mass or other religious service. Classical music is analogous for me and many others.

Jan. 04 2013 05:16 PM

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