Results of Q2 Music's Second Annual New-Music Countdown

Bring in the New Year with the Best Music of the Last 100 Years

Friday, December 28, 2012

A few weeks ago, we asked Q2 Music listeners to weigh in with their favorite classical music of the last 100 years. As promised, we've tallied the votes and Friday, Dec. 28 at 9 pm, we'll begin our second annual New-Music Countdown. While some of the usual suspects made the cut, there were plenty of new and unexpected entries... but our lips our sealed. 

Join us in bringing in 2013 with your favorite 100 pieces of the last 100 years.

The countdown runs Friday from 9 pm to midnight and continues Saturday and Sunday from 6 am to midnight. On Monday, Dec. 31st, beginning at 4 pm we'll round out the year with what you voted as the cream of the crop.

You can check this page for updates of the countdown list every few hours. To find out what recordings were played, please consult our playlists page.

Curious about last year's winners? Check out the results of our 2011 New-Music Countdown as well as WQXR's 2011 Classical Countdown.

The Countdown

100. John Luther Adams: Dream in White on White
99. Terry Riley: A Rainbow in Curved Air
98. Philip Glass: String Quartet No. 5
97. Maurice Ravel: Concerto for the Left Hand
96. Luciano Berio: Naturale
95. Louis Andriessen: De Staat
94. John Cage: String Quartet in Four Parts
93. Esa-Pekka Salonen: Insomnia
92. Conlon Nancarrow: Study #21 for Player Piano
91. John Adams: Road Movies
90. Gyorgy Kurtag: Stele
89. Henry Cowell: The Tides of Manaunaun
88. Gyorgy Ligeti: Violin Concerto
87. Giacinto Scelsi: Anahit
86. Gerard Grisey: Quatre Chants
85. Bela Bartok: Divertimento
84. Gavin Bryars: The Sinking of the Titanic
83. Steve Reich: Electric Counterpoint
82. Elliott Carter: Concerto for Orchestra
81. Carl Ruggles: Sun-Treader
80. Benjamin Britten: Violin Concerto
79. Arnold Schoenberg: String Trio
78. Arvo Part: Tabula Rasa
77. Elliott Carter: String Quartet No. 2
76. Bela Bartok: Violin Concerto No. 2
75. Anton Webern: Five Movements for String Quartet
74. Carl Nielsen: Clarinet Concerto
73. Aaron Copland: Piano Variations
72. Alban Berg: Lyric Suite
71. Anna Clyne: Roulette
70. Witold Lutoslawski: Symphony No. 3
69. Arvo Part: Summa
68. Steve Reich: Tehillim
67. Sonnacha Dennehy: Gra agus Bas
66. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
65. Sergei Prokofiev: Symphony No. 1, "Classical"
64. Bela Bartok: Miraculous Mandarin
63. Steve Reich: Sextet
62. Pierre Boulez: Le Marteau Sans Maitre
61. Osvaldo Golijov: Ayre
60. Steve Reich: Mallet Quartet
59. Pierre Boulez: Derive
58. Maurice Durufle: Requiem
57. Lou Harrison: Grand Duo
56. Luciano Berio: Sinfonia
55. La Monte Young: The Well-Tuned Piano (excerpt: "The Elysian Fields")
54. John Adams: Shaker Loops
53. Steve Reich: Double Sextet
52. Edward Elgar: Cello Concerto
51. Gyorgy Ligeti: Lux Aeterna
50. George Crumb: Makrokosmos III: "Music for a Summer Evening"
49. Ernest Bloch: Concerto Grosso No. 1
48. John Adams: Violin Concerto
47. Edgard Varese: Ameriques
46. Dmitri Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1
45. David Lang: The Little Match Girl Passion
44. Charles Ives: Concord Sonata
43. Bela Bartok: Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta
42. Arvo Part: Te Deum
41. Thomas Ades: Tevot
40. Arvo Part: Fratres
39. Ottorino Respighi: The Pines of Rome
38. Sergei Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5
37. Samuel Barber: Adagio for Strings 
36. John Cage: 4'33" (for the sake of radio format, we’ve substituted In a Landscape)
35. Gyorgy Ligeti: Atmospheres 
34. Dmitri Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 8 
33. Charles Ives: Symphony No. 4 
32. Igor Stravinsky: Petrushka
31. Steve Reich: Different Trains
30. Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 7
29. George Gershwin: An American in Paris
28. Charles Ives: Three Places in New England
27. Olivier Messiaen: Turangalila-Symphonie
26. John Adams: Short Ride in a Fast Machine
25. Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5
24. Igor Stravinsky: Agon
23. Henryk Gorecki: Symphony No. 3
22. Bela Bartok: String Quartet No. 4
21. Arvo Part: Spiegel Im Spiegel
20. Thomas Ades: Asyla
19. Benjamin Britten: War Requiem (excerpt)
18. Carl Nielsen: Symphony No. 5
17. Terry Riley: In C
16. Samuel Barber: Violin Concerto
15. Morton Feldman: Rothko Chapel
14. Philip Glass: Einstein on the Beach
13. Leonard Bernstein: Candide: Suite
12. Gustav Holst: The Planets
11. George Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue
10. Alban Berg: Violin Concerto
9. Olivier Messiaen: Quartet for the End of Time
8. Igor Stravinsky: Symphony of Psalms
7. Bela Bartok: Concerto for Orchestra
6. Leonard Bernstein: Symphonic Dances from West Side Story
5. John Adams: The Dharma at Big Sur
4. John Adams: Harmonielehre
3. Aaron Copland: Appalachian Spring
2. Igor Stravinsky: Rite of Spring
1. Steve Reich: Music for 18 Musicians

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Comments [16]

Lawrence from NYC

No Harry Partch (Delusion of the Fury)? Fred Rzewski (The People United Will Never Be Defeated)? Fausto Romitelli (Professor Bad Trip)? Cornelius Cardew (The Great Learning, Paragraph 7)? George Antheil (Fighting the Waves)? Or how about Jennifer Higdon, Revueltas, Xenakis? How does Glenn Branca get into the top 100? (He's not even in my top 1000.)

Dec. 29 2013 12:42 PM

I'm new to Q2. It's such an enjoyment to me. I can't criticize this list, I'm thrilled at discovering anything in contemporary music. I didn't know how many composers there could be. I feel it is essential to encourage living composers. I don't like everything however, but I'm really interested in listening something difficult to get used to it. Thanks for the great job you make. I'm always connected to Q2 when I get a chance. Thanks for having played Angele Dubeau (violonist) from Montreal last month.

Dec. 28 2013 09:17 PM
Jonella Rose from Lonely, IGG-ORANT Boondocks of Sullivan County, NY

I agree with the comment above: "Shenanigans!!" - AND HOW!!! ABSOLUTELY!!! What the hell is this list?!! I wasn't around to hear these DREADFUL pieces played last year - STEVE REICH?!?! - ADAMS?! - GLASS?! - ARE YOU KIDDING ME?! IS THIS SOME KIND OF JOKE???!!! GIVE ME A BREAK!! - SOMETHING'S ROTTEN IN QXR IF THIS IS YOUR LIST OF (obviously cooked-up by cold, overly-intellectual Renegades) FAVORITES OF YOUR LISTENERS. NOT LIKELY, MY MAN, NOT LIKELY. THIS IS TOTAL BS - PLAIN AND SIMPLE. WHAT KIND OF IDIOT GOONS DID THE VOTING? - CRASHED THE BALLOT BOX?! EH?! YOU HAVE SOME NERVE GOING ALONG WITH OBVIOUSLY CROOKED, COOKED-UP, LAUGHABLE, "STUFFED!" RESULTS LIKE THESE!!! THIS IS OUTRAGEOUS!!! NOW I REALLY CANNOT TAKE YOUR LIST SERIOUSLY AND IF THESE ARE THE KINDS OF MUSIC YOU'LL BE PLAYING DURING THE COUNTDOWN - COUNT ME OUT!!!! I WILL NOT BE LISTENING. I'll find something else to listen to. Something ENJOYABLE and ENRICHING and hopefully BEAUTIFUL AND MOVING - AND MEANINGFUL - not this UGG-ILY ELECTRONIC ATONAL GARBAGE.
So - well - enjoy this bunch of disgusting non-musical UGG-ILY MUSIC. See ya another time...
Jonella
P.S. I love Chopin, Mozart, Beethoven, Schuman & Schubert, Mendelsohn & Gershwin. Choose anything - love them all.

Dec. 22 2013 05:50 PM
Graham Barkham from NYC

This relates to last year's countdown. I've got a swell idea: You'll create lots of room for near misses, if you lump as a single entry Beethoven's symphonies 3, 5,6,7 & 9. It gives you 4 more spots. After all if the Brandenburg concerti can be grouped as a single entry, what's the big deal?

Dec. 04 2013 01:20 PM
Donnally Miller

Where is Shostakovich's Symphony No. 10?

Jan. 02 2013 04:43 PM
Daniel from Norristown PA

Missing William Walton--'Facade' and "Belshazzar's Feast" should be on this list.

Jan. 02 2013 07:44 AM
Russ from Scotch Plains, NJ

Some very unusual choices, especially in the top 50. Where's the top 10? My wife ane I have a lot riding on this. I declare shananagans!!!

Jan. 01 2013 11:13 AM
Barbara from Mountainsdie, NJ

I see a lot of music I'v never heard of before. What I would really like to know is, HOW MANY PEOPLE VOTED in this contest?

And just like the other person writing in, whee are the top ten. I kew Beethoven's 9th would be the winner, even though it is NOT my favorite, but who was #2? I fell asleep before it aired.

Thanks for the answers to these questions. I'm a listener since 1942

Jan. 01 2013 09:21 AM
Bob from East Brunswick, N.J.

Gee, is the station ever gonna reveal 1-10? It's 9 am on New Year's morning. I hope they're interesting choices, like many of the others, but if Arvo Part is in there, I'll vomit.

Jan. 01 2013 09:04 AM
Mara from NYC

Henna,were you looking at the list above that's filled with Berg,Berio, and Reich because this is the Q2 countdown and there's no Boccherini in these parts!

Dec. 31 2012 11:49 PM
henna kenigsberg from nyc

i've just looked over your 2012 list and it's very interesting and wonderfully varied. i wonder why, then, you don't take your listeners taste into consideration when you play music the rest of the year. i saw no boccherini or glazunov on your list- yet your airwaves are often filled with that stuff, instead of what we've been getting the last couple of days. i think if you want people to stick with your station,and fork over money.. you might actually consider the taste of your voting public.

Dec. 31 2012 09:10 PM
Q2 Music

Thank you all for listening and for pointing out this problem!

Dec. 30 2012 08:02 PM
Partfan from NYC

Thank you for making the playlist page work again.

Dec. 30 2012 07:16 PM
thad davis from north central idaho

I agree with Partfan.

Dec. 30 2012 01:46 PM
Partfan from NYC

Please, please, PLEASE! Fix the web playlist page so I can know what is playing. This whole website needs an overhaul, it's so complicated and convoluted. Why can't we have a Q2 landing page that has an updating playlist?

Dec. 30 2012 11:08 AM
Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

OUTSTANDING LIST OF COMPOSERS OF THE LAST CENTURY BUT I MISSED SEEING LEONARD BERNSTEIN WHO CERTAINLY WEAS ACTIVE IN EVERY PHASE OF MUSIC, COMPOSING, CONDUCTING AND TEACHING AT HARVARD AND THE YOUNG PEOPLES CONCERTS. ALBAN BERG, ANTON BRUCKNER, BENJAMIN BRITTEN, SERGE PROKOFIEFF, SHOSTAKOVICH, GEORGE ANTHEIL, MARTIN KALMANOFF AND RALPH VAUGHN WILLIAMS, ALL CLASSICAL COMPOSERS MERIT BEING NOMINATED AMONG THE BEST 100. I am a romantischer heldentenor.
I have sung four solo concerts in the Isaac Stern Auditorium of Carnegie Hall. As part of my Ten Language Solo Debut concert at the Isaac Stern Auditorium of Carnegie Hall, I opened my three hour concert with the Invocazione di Orfeo from Jacopo Peri's opera EURIDICE composed in 1600, the first opera, composed in the same year as Shakespeare wrote HAMLET. It, and from the same concert, can be heard my singing Florestan's "Gott, welch Dunkel hier ! from Beethoven's FIDELIO and "Sound an Alarm" from Handel's JUDAS MACXCABAEUS in the live performance on my three websites, www.WagnerOpera.com, , www.ShakespeareOpera.com, and www.RichardWagnerMusicDramaInstitute.com. They received rave critical notices in newspapers and magazines. My voice teachers were the legendary MET OPERA singers Alexander Kipnis, Friedrich Schorr, Frieda Hempel, Martial Singher, John Brownlee, Karin Branzell and Margarete Matzenauer. As an opera composer myself ["Shakespeare" and "The Political Shakespeare"] I fully comprehend the assumed urgency of recognition of the still living. I am the director of the Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute in Boonton, NJ where I train actors in all the Shakespeare roles and big-voiced singers in all the Wagner opera roles. My singing of TRISTAN, RIENZI, LOHENGRIN, GOTTERDAMMERUNG SIEGFRIED, SIEGFRIED, SIEGMUND, WALTHER VON STOLZING PARSIFAL, ELEAZAR, FEDERICO, ORFEO and OTELLO can also be heard at RECORDED SELECTIONS on my three websites.

Dec. 29 2012 05:28 PM

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