Jean-Yves Thibaudet and Beethoven's Symphony No. 7

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Thursday, January 24, 2013

Manfred Honeck makes his New York Philharmonic debut conducting Braunfels’s Suite from Fantastic Apparitions on a Theme by Berlioz, Grieg’s Piano Concerto with Jean-Yves Thibaudet as soloist, and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7.

Program details:

Braunfels: Suite from Fantastic Apparitions on a Theme by Berlioz

Grieg: Piano Concerto

Beethoven: Symphony No. 7

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Comments [4]

Les from Miami, Florida

I'm sorry about the typo: it's Erich Kleiber.

Jan. 27 2013 01:09 PM
Les from Miami, Florida

I completely agree with Len and Dakra about the Beethoven Seventh Symphony performance. In addition to Manfred Honeck's interpretive decisions, I think the detail desideratum was certainly aided and abetted by the antiphonal violin seating plan the Orchestra employs that I favor so much. One such decision was to allow the timpani a louder and more promient dymanic than is usually heard,though it's written as was heard here in the score. The Trio in the third movement was as Beethoven wrote, "assai meno presto"; and the movement's tempo was certainly "Presto". The second movement, taken at the traditional slower tempo than indicated, distinguished itself by the first and second violins employing pizzicato rather than resuming arco (bowed notes) in the final four bars of the movement, an edition or performing choice also favored by Carlos Kleiber (and I think his father, Eric). The Grieg Piano Concerto benefitted from a real collaboration of the orchestra with the soloist: accents and "fz" marks especially in the brass choir, were heard to advantage. Mr. Thibaudet has a masterful facility with rapid sixteenth and thirty-second note configurations that make things sound easy. I'd like to hear the Braunfel piece on Berlioz "Song of the Flea" excerpt again and hope it becomes a repertory piece favored by many orchestras. It was fun to hear and it makes me eager to hear more of his music. Altogether, it was an auspicious New York Philharmonic debut for Manfred Honeck.

Jan. 27 2013 01:06 PM
len from brooklyn ny

a rousing performance of one of the greatest symphonies ever written.
Honeck took the music where it was destined to be,by the great master.
It is still marvellous to know that is achievable and that there is still an audience willing and able to go along for the ride of a lifetime. when it happens, the human spirit is lifted up. Bravo.

Jan. 24 2013 10:01 PM

This was a terrific performance of Beethoven's 7th. It demonstrated what Mr. Thibaudet said in the interview about how Mr. Honeck achieves balance among the pieces of the orchestra. For example, in the first movement where other conductors let the contrasting bah dah's at the end of a bar be emphatic and separate, and similarly near the end of the last movement, Mr. Honeck managed to keep them in the flow as part of the whole.

Jan. 24 2013 09:42 PM

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