Bach and Forth

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Emmanuel Ceysson. Emmanuel Ceysson. (© JC Husson)

For a special Bach 360 edition of the Young Artists Showcase, host Bob Sherman presents some interesting performances on instruments and in arrangements that Johann Sebastian wouldn’t have imagined.

The program begins gently with 2004 Young Artists alum Emmanuel Ceysson on harp. Then a few Young Artists guests from 2008: Dror Baitel playing a Violin Partita on piano; the Jerusalem Young Saxophone Quartet performing an arrangement of the famous “Air on the G string;” and a marimba percussion duo arrangement of the 2nd English Suite.

Then the program takes a trip to Iowa for Percy Grainger’s take on the chorale Sheep May Safely Graze, and to Frankfurt, Germany, for cantata reimaginings by the Calmus Ensemble of Leipzig. Encores are provided by Jacques Loussier and his jazz trio.

Program details:

J.S. Bach: Courante and Gigue from French Suite No. 3
— Emanuel Ceysson, harp.

J.S. Bach (arr. Rachmaninoff): Prelude, Gavotte and Gigue from Violin Partita in E
— Dror Baitel, piano.

J.S. Bach: Air from Orchestral Suite No. 3
— Jerusalem Young Saxophone Quartet.

J.S. Bach: Prelude, Allemande, Bourrees and Gigue from English Suite No. 2
— PercaDu (marimba and percussion duo).

J.S. Bach (arr. Percy Grainger): Blithe Bells ("A Ramble on Bach’s Sheep May Safely Graze")
— University of Iowa Symphony Band; Myron Welch, conductor.

J.S. Bach: “Hat man nicht mit seinen Kindern” from the Coffee Cantata 211
J.S. Bach: “Weichet nur, betrübte Schatten” from the Wedding Cantata 202
— Calmus Ensemble of Leipzig.

J.S. Bach (arr. Jacques Loussier: Little Fugue in G Minor
— Jacques Loussier Trio.

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Comments [1]

Debbie Parente-Rosin from Westfield, NJ

Hello. Our family has been listening virtually non- stop to the Bach 360 program and have been listening to the Bach stories many of which have been repeated more than once. Our son, Michael Rosin, a 21-year-old composer called in a few weeks ago with a heartfelt and passionate story about his first experience of Bach's music when he was in 8th grade. I hope you will play his testimonial - it would mean a great deal to him and to us, his family of musicians not unlike that of Johann and his family!
I too discovered Bach in middle school when I began to play his music on piano and sang the Magnificat when I was 13. I distinctly remember tears coming to my eyes and being overwhelmed by the beauty of the music during the rehearsal. Very hard to sing while you are crying!

Mar. 27 2013 03:00 PM

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