Mahler Symphonies, Part I

« previous episode | next episode »

Monday, July 01, 2013

"A symphony should be like the world: it must embrace everything," Gustav Mahler famously said. With his 10-plus symphonies, Mahler’s world extended horizons beyond anything known to concert audiences. His vision stretched the boundaries of the orchestra and the symphonic form.

The WQXR e-newsletter. Show highlights, links to music news, on-demand concerts, events from The Greene Space and more.

Comments [4]

Sarah E. from Bronx

I have to say that I have not listened to much of Mahler's work before, but now have a new liking for it. One area I am well awere of is his Symphoiles and hope you will play parts from them. I hope that for the new season, you think about my idea to do a spotlight on the four different ranges of the voice on each night of the week, letting Friday be the day where the different ranges do duets, trios and four-part works.
Thank You.
P.S please make sure that altos and counterternor are doing the alto parts, second and first soprano have their own works without sing alto as well, Thank You.

Jul. 05 2013 03:34 PM
alvin p mckerracher from belleville ill (st louis mo.)

you are doing good things

Jul. 04 2013 10:42 PM
Joebisog from Madison, WI

I'm sitting here conducting Mahler. Learning the connection between Mahler's songs yesterday with Hampson to the symphonies was enlightening. Bill McGlaughlin's program is always fantastic and this Mahler riff is sublime.

Jul. 02 2013 09:29 PM

I thought Mr. McGlaughlin's program was excellent and look forward to the others.

I've had a long interest in Das Klagende Lied but one oddity I've noticed occurs in the fratricide scene of the first movement where the brother is resting under a tree before he is murdered, the material is very similar to the end of the Wayfarer songs where the hero finds peace under the Linden trees but I'm not sure which actually came first as Mahler apparently revised Klagende a couple of times. A strange leitmotif?

Jul. 01 2013 11:27 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.