Martina Arroyo’s Prelude to Performance

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Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Tenor Javier Bernardo and pianist Nicholas Fox warm up before performing on the Young Artists Showcase. Tenor Javier Bernardo and pianist Nicholas Fox warm up before performing on the Young Artists Showcase. (Kim Nowacki/WQXR)

Martina Arroyo won the Metropolitan Opera Auditions in 1958. When the Young Artists Showcase began two decades later, Arroyo was a star at the Met and toured the world’s best opera houses. Nearly 10 years ago, Arroyo began a program to teach young singers how to inhabit an opera role. The Martina Arroyo Foundation’s Prelude to Performance is an intensive summer program that presents four fully staged performances of two complete operas with orchestra and chorus.

In this special episode of the Young Artists Showcase, Arroyo (pictured, right) joins host Bob Sherman and students from her Prelude to Performance program, who perform excerpts from L'elisir d'amore and Les contes d'Hoffmann. Thursday through Sunday, these singers will be performing full productions of those operas at the Danny Kaye Playhouse at Arroyo’s alma mater, Hunter College.

Program details:

Gaetano Donizetti: L'elisir d'amore
1) "Quanto e bella"
— Javier Bernardo (tenor)
2) "Come Paride Vezzoso"
— Jorell Williams (baritone)
3) "Una parola, o Adina"
— Yunnie Park (soprano); Javier Bernardo (tenor)
4) "Udite, udite, o rustici"
— Stephen K. Foster (bass-baritone)

Jacques Offenbach: Les contes d'Hoffmann
1) "Chanson de Kleinzach"
— Won Whi Choi (tenor)
2) "Belle nuit, ô nuit d'amour"
— Nian Wang (mezzo-soprano); Brandie Sutton (soprano)
3) "Les oiseaux"
— Mizuho Takeshita (soprano)
4) Act II Trio
— Lenora Green (soprano); Chantelle Grant (mezzo-soprano); Yuriy Yurchuk (bass-baritone)

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Comments [2]

Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

MARTINA ARROYO, the complete artist and wholesome empathetic human being. I remember her from the days when I sang the title role of FRA DIAVOLO in the Met Opera's assistant manager John Gutman's adaptation into English of the French original libretto for Francois Daniel Auber's FRA DIAVOLO given its premiere at the Hunter College Playhouse now renamed the Danny Kaye Playhouse. Rose Landver was the stage director and Maestro William Tarrasch [of Broadway's STREET SCENE by Kurt Weill] was at the orchestra's helm. Others in the cast were Janet Southwick, Peter Binder and William Workman. In the Hunter College Opera Workshop, I sang the Radames to Martina's Aida in a scene from AIDA. When we ate together with others in the school's cafeteria, Martina's buoyant self-deprecating humor produced belly laughs. She is one rare thoroughly, universally, appreciated talent and human being. It is hard to think of anyone more deserving of the Kennedy Center honors. I am a Wagnerian heldentenor, an opera composer ["SHAKESPEARE" and "THE POLITICAL SHAKESPEARE"] and the director of The Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, where all the Wagner and all the Shakespeare roles are taught as well as vocal technque for singing and declamation. www.WagnerOpera.com

Sep. 17 2013 08:09 AM
Lee Lieberman from Fort Lee, NJ

these fresh young voices are very exciting to listen to. They all have fine
qualities and we can only hope they are lucky enough in the competitive artistic world to float to success--my impression is that they have put in plenty of hard work already. Kudos to Bob Sherman and Martina Arroyo,

Jul. 10 2013 09:56 PM

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