The Long Shadow of the Atomic Bomb

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Saturday, August 10, 2013

On August 6, 1945, the U.S. dropped an atom bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima—the first use of an atomic bomb during wartime. A few days later, on August 9, with the bombing of Nagasaki, an atomic bomb was used during war for the last time—so far.

A few feature films have been made which tell the story of The Manhattan Project and the development and use of the bomb, and to commemorate the significant events of 68 years ago, David Garland presents some powerful music by composers Ennio Morricone, Hugo Friedhofer, and Daniele Amfitheatrof, written for the films "Fat Man and Little Boy," "Above and Beyond," and "The Beginning or the End."

And we hear some related music from "Dr. Strangelove," "Hell and High Water" and "The Wolverine."

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Comments [2]

The joys of cut and paste.

The correct name of the Glasser film, mentioned above (and below) is 'The Beginning of the End' rather than "The Beginning or the End." Apparently, David Garland made the same error.

Aug. 23 2013 04:50 PM

It is a serious error to place 'The Beginning or the End,' in the same paragraph as 'Above and Beyond' or 'Fat Man and Little Boy'. 'The Beginning or the End' is a science fiction drama concerning giant grasshoppers devouring Chicago--and their destruction by means of a nuclear device. The other two films are historical dramas--albeit, poor ones--concerning the development and dropping of the atomic bomb during the Second World-War.

By the way, since 'The Beginning or the End' was mentioned, composer Albert Glasser should have been noted along with it. In total, Glasser wrote the scores to 135 films, 300 television shows, and 450 radio programs. Moreover, he scored the music for Frank Capra's seven part WW-II documentary, 'Why We Fight'. Glasser learned film scoring from Max Steiner and Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

Aug. 23 2013 04:41 PM

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