Good Dog!

This episode originally aired on Saturday, February 18, 2012

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Saturday, August 24, 2013

Dogs make great cinematic heroes. They're the perfect protagonists for the classic movie story themes of courage, hope and loyalty. Plus, they're cute, charming, furry and speak a language everyone understands.

Invite your pet to "sit!" and listen as Movies on the Radio goes to the dogs. David Garland presents music from great dog movies--music with just the right frisky-factor to depict canine playfulness, as well as the drama of dangerous situations and happy reunions.

We hear from "Marley & Me," "Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey," and other recent dog movies. But the centerpiece of the show is the extraordinary five-CD set of "Lassie" film scores released by Film Score Monthly. From that set we hear from "Lassie Come Home," "Courage of Lassie," and more, featuring music by composers such as Daniele Amfitheatrof, Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and André Previn, scored for symphony orchestra and the famous collie's barks and yips.

Lassie Come Home (1943) trailer:

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Comments [7]

Silversalty from Brooklyn

One of my favorite dog sidekicks wasn't a real dog at least in flesh and blood ("meat bag" scifi) terms - K9, from an old Doctor Who series. I think it was initially with Tom Baker as "the Doctor." K9 was given a return to television in a recent series spin off revival of the Tom Baker female sidekick character Sarah Jane Smith with the seemingly ageless Elisabeth Sladen. Sadly Ms. Sladen died recently, receiving a lament from K9 (along with millions of others) to his "mistress."

Aug. 25 2013 11:04 AM
Cathy from California

I think this show with music from dog movies was my favorite, my 2 dogs were listening and it was their favorite as well

Aug. 24 2013 10:29 PM
Johnny from Riverdale

The film rights to lassie were just sold in the last year...along with the Lone Ranger and many others. I'm not sure who the buyer was...like Spielberg or some one of that caliber. Nice to enjoy this compilation.
Johnny

PS
Site does not work well with iPhones.
:)

Aug. 24 2013 10:16 PM
Silversalty from Brooklyn

The American television Lassie series boy sidekick that I remember was Tommy Rettig. Rettig went on to become an established PC database programmer (dBase and its variants) writing several books on the genre. Sadly he died fairly young (54 - WikiP).

Aug. 24 2013 09:30 PM
Stephanie J. Hughes from Manchester, NJ

I love this show. I love most of your shows, but this one strikes a wonderful, warm, "fuzzy" core!
I do, however, miss the playlist you used to include, so that you could see, as well as hear, what you're hearing so that you can perhaps add it to you collection.
Hope your vacation was terrific! Missed you tonight!

Aug. 24 2013 09:10 PM
Silversalty from Brooklyn

It was a little strange looking at the trailer and seeing actors famous, at least to me, for other roles. Nigel Bruce as the bumbling Doctor Watson sidekick to Basil Rathbone's Sherlock Holmes. Elsa Lancaster as the Mary Shelley/Bride of Frankenstein and Roddy McDowall, who even with all the ape makeup, was so distinctive, through his voice, in his role in Planet of the Apes. Also, the invisible Elizabeth Taylor, memorable as .. Elizabeth Taylor.

Checking the movies mentioned in the trailer I noticed that these were made during WWII with many of the same players. They had a very much different character from (than - seemingly the current usage) the movies made today.

I mean, where are the zombies??!! Shouldn't Lassie be chased by zombies at some point? Maybe the zombie dog out of Grand Central Station in "I Am Legend."

Aug. 24 2013 08:36 AM
concetta nardone from Nassau

Dogs are much too good for us. We do not deserve them. We deserve cats who manipulate us by being soft, warm and clean.

Aug. 24 2013 08:03 AM

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