Emerson String Quartet Live From (L)PR

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Monday, April 26, 2010

The Emerson String Quartet has received an unparalleled list of awards, including nine Grammies, three Gramophone awards and the Avery Fisher Prize. Time Magazine called them “America’s greatest quartet”—but even this may be an understatement.

Join WQXR.org on April 26th at 8 p.m. for a rare audio webcast of the Emerson String Quartet performing live from Le Poisson Rouge in Greenwich Village. You’ll hear selections from some the quartet’s ambitious recording projects, including works by Bach, Shostakovich and Janacek. Plus: Take part in a live chat during the performance.

Listen live Monday, April 26th at 8 p.m. by selecting the Special Program tab from the WQXR player in the upper right corner of the page.

Hosted by:

Terrance McKnight
The WQXR e-newsletter. Show highlights, links to music news, on-demand concerts, events from The Greene Space and more.

Comments [4]

AIA from Upper West side

I wanted to get to Le Poisson rouge tonight, but I teach too late to get there. The live stream was the next best thing. I would have liked more whole pieces, but it was an amazing evening of music, especially the Janacek and Shostakovitch.

Apr. 26 2010 09:23 PM
Al Luna

I'm of Hispanic descent (PR'can). I love Haydn, Faure, Spohr...you get the idea. But I also love Turina, Granados, Breton, Anton Garcia-Abril, Ponce, Piazzolla and Torroba. Yes, I agree the cuchi-cuchi stereotype is still out there. I refuse to play the "role". I also think that Spanish music is more than just "El Concierto De Aranjuez". Garcia-Abril has composed guitar concertos, piano concertos and film music, I've never heard them on this station (or any other station). Maybe they get the overnight playlist. But I think it's more than just that. I think it's a common human tendency to place everyone in a certain category. If you are Hispanic, you must "act" Hispanic. We just have to remind everyone that our Hispanic music has a rich history as vital as any other culture. I think the Naxos label does a pretty good job at introducing complete works of the Spanish and Latin American composers staying way clear of the stereo type. But in all honesty sometimes you can't get away from the Latin in Latin-American, that's just part of the structure of the music. BTW I also like salsa music, but that is not all I am. We don't have to be as one dimensional as people expect us to be.

Apr. 26 2010 11:11 AM

Jaime - thank you for your comment. And you're right, we're all about being musically and culturally inclusive. I hope you hear that in our presentation whenever you're listening to our station. Please stay in touch.

Apr. 21 2010 10:43 PM
Jaime F, Gaviria jr. from New-York City.

Well I love clasical music because it enriches the spirit, cultivates the mind and beters our prespective on life!!! we should have more classical music radio stations, not only one ( haning on a shoe string) " sorry" but I wish clasics were more availiable to more segments of society, not just a few; I want to hear more gustavo Dudamil play more clasics and less latin tunes, SA is very European, like Chile, Argentina and Colombia.- I feel why should the Eastern Europeans and orientals take al the glory and Latins are stil being seen as cuchi, cuchi. I know for sure that too much politics take place when we turn on the radio, Americans have not seen yet what an influence Spain and SA peoples can do for the classics; hope to hear feed back from you ( friendship and harmony should be the true spirit o classical music not separation of the peoples)

Apr. 21 2010 04:37 PM

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