Published by
Project 440

Daniel Wohl

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+ou-

Performed by Transit

Scored for bass clarinet, piano, cello, percussion and electronics, the initial concept for +ou- (pronounced "plus ou moins") was to compose music that would be heard through a veil of noise. The idea came from waking up in the middle of the night with the television set turned to a nonworking channel. The screen was mostly filled with black and white static, except for a faded image of what looked like an old couple dancing. The image would come in strongly and then recede into the static

Glitch

Performed by Chris Otto, John Pickford Richards, Andie Springer and Evelyn Farny.

A glitch is a short-lived fault in a system. All audio mediums inherently contain glitches that are interesting in their own ways. To me they are happy accidents, flaws that take on special meaning or interest. The hiss and pops of vinyl records, the skips on a scratched CD, and mp3 compression errors are glitches that have become emblematic of each medium, and have come to represent an era in music. In the age of mechanical reproduction, a player’s mistake on an acoustic instrument such as a tiny variation in pitch, an inconsistency in bowing, or an accidental scratch in the midst of an otherwise “normal’ playing style can now read as a glitch. It’s interesting to me that these mistakes have made their way into the standard repertoire in the last century and have come to be called extended techniques. This tendency has also appeared in the glitch style of electronic music by bands such as The Boats and Oval.

Errors form the conceptual basis for this piece. Each movement deals with a different kind of glitch in the electronic track. The electronics consist entirely of manipulated string recordings, while the string quartet plays its share of intentional pops, hisses, fragmentary melodic motifs and other inconsistencies that comment on or reflect back to the electronics track.
In my own composing, accidents have often led to interesting results. Crucial moments have arrived in the form of mistakes that I’ve then tried to mold into coherent structures.

A glitch is a short-lived fault in a system. All audio mediums inherently contain glitches that are interesting in their own ways. To me they are happy accidents, flaws that take on special meaning or interest. The hiss and pops of vinyl records, the skips on a scratched CD, and mp3 compression errors are glitches that have become emblematic of each medium, and have come to represent an era in music. In the age of mechanical reproduction, a player’s mistake on an acoustic instrument such as a tiny variation in pitch, an inconsistency in bowing, or an accidental scratch in the midst of an otherwise “normal’ playing style can now read as a glitch. It’s interesting to me that these mistakes have made their way into the standard repertoire in the last century and have come to be called extended techniques. This tendency has also appeared in the glitch style of electronic music by bands such as The Boats and Oval.Errors form the conceptual basis for this piece. Each movement deals with a different kind of glitch in the electronic track. The electronics consist entirely of manipulated string recordings, while the string quartet plays its share of intentional pops, hisses, fragmentary melodic motifs and other inconsistencies that comment on or reflect back to the electronics track.In my own composing, accidents have often led to interesting results. Crucial moments have arrived in the form of mistakes that I’ve then tried to mold into coherent structures.