On-Demand Audio: Witold Lutosławski Centennial Tribute

Live from Symphony Space's Thalia Theater on December 12, 2013

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Friday, December 20, 2013

On FridayDec. 13 at 7:30 pm, Q2 Music celebrated the centenary of Polish composer Witold Lutosławski with a live audio webcast from Symphony Space featuring a performance by the American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME).

Hosted by Symphony Space artistic director Laura Kaminsky, the evening included three works of Lutosławski for strings, as well as music by and conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and noted Lutosławski scholar Steven Stucky

Lutosławski passed away on Feb. 7, 1994 at the age of 81 in Warsaw, Poland, by which time he had developed a distinct, commanding creative voice and become known as one of the most respected, influential and exceptional composers of the 20th century. Though his music will resonate with audiences well into the 21st century, he also will be remembered for his tireless work to promote and nurture future generations of composers through his scholarships and international workshops. 

The concert is presented as part of Symphony Space’s In the Salon series. 

Program Details:

Lutosławski: Bukoliki for viola and cello
Lutosławski: Sacher Variation for solo cello
Stucky: Dialoghi for solo cello
- Intermission - 
Stucky: Nell'ombra, nella luce for string quartet
Lutosławski: String Quartet 

The American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME) consists of Caroline Shaw & Caleb Burhans, violins; Nadia Sirota, viola; and Clarice Jensen, cello.

 

Celebrating Poland: Lutosławski, Penderecki and New Music Now is supported, in part, by the Adam Mickiewicz Institute as part of Polska Music programme, and is presented in partnership with the Polish Cultural Institute New York.

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Comments [1]

gina ballinger from graz, austia

listening over and over to grasp : ) thank you!

Jan. 02 2014 12:20 PM

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