Injured Lorin Maazel Cancels More Concerts, With Wide Repercussions

Monday, April 14, 2014 - 01:24 PM

Lorin Maazel Lorin Maazel (Chris Lee)

An unnamed accident has caused Lorin Maazel to drop out of a series of high-profile concerts this spring, the latest being the Boston Symphony Orchestra's 10-day tour to Japan and China.

The orchestra said that Charles Dutoit will take Maazel's place on the tour, which includes stops in Tokyo, Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou from May 1-10. The BSO had no further details on the nature of Maazel's accident, which is expected to keep him sidelined until the third week of May.

The 84-year-old conductor previously dropped out of two concerts over the weekend at Carnegie Hall, where he was to lead the Munich Philharmonic. Valery Gergiev stepped in on Friday night; Fabio Luisi replaced Maazel on Saturday. The former substitution had other ripple effects: it caused Gergiev to miss the closing-night concert at the Trans Siberian Art Festival in Novosibirsk, Russia on Saturday night. (Gergiev had arrived in New York from London on Friday morning but making it back to Novosibirsk on Saturday was apparently impossible, even by his whirlwind standards.)

The Novosibirsk concert proceeded with a noteworthy twist. According to a report on MusicalAmerica.com, after some lengthy deliberations, violin soloist Vadim Repin decided to play the Shostakovich Violin Concerto No. 1 without a conductor. It was a risky (and seemingly rare) move for such an intricate, rhythmically complex work. The performance not only went off without any major hitches, but it was, deemed the music-industry website, “a triumph, one of the most inspired and passionate interpretations of the work I’ve ever heard.”

Back in New York, a group of some 20 protesters greeted Gergiev outside Carnegie Hall on Friday, opposed to the conductor’s friendship with Russian President Vladimir Putin and to his support for Russia’s invasion and annexation of Crimea. The objections were confined to the outside of the hall, however. Inside, "all was warm and welcoming," according to the New York Times. A spokesman for Gergiev said he had no comment on the protests.

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Comments [2]

Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

Maestro Lorin Maazel died on July 13th at his home in Virginia.
Maestro LORIN MAAZEL accomplished without fanfare improvements in rehearsing techniques wherein the composer's, not some venturesome virtuoso's, limelight visions holds sway. ARTURO TOSCANINI'S lot was pretty much the same. I attended many TOSCANINI rehearsals at Studio 8 H nd at Carnegie Hall as a family member of a violinist in the orchestra who vouched for me even though I was NOT a family member. MAAZEL's approach was albeit mechanical and not fiery as Toscanini, but it was effective. Too bad for MAAZEL that he did not realize the antipathy was based on his lack of respect for
Comment

Jul. 14 2014 01:49 PM
george

Why do they allow mummies to conduct at 84 yrs ? Conductors should be forced to retire at 65 and make way for young talented aspirants. He`s filthy rich anyway !

As to Gergiev...musicians should keep their political opinions for themselves. I for one will boycott him as I did since I heard and saw him in Baden-Baden several years ago. Any conductor who allows a performance of a Wagner opera with Russian singers that can not hold the notes long enough and gasp for air, no thank you. It was a catastrophy. He should stay with Swan Lake ! ! !

May. 01 2014 05:42 AM

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