Mostly Slavic

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On this episode of Reflections, David Dubal features a few golden nuggets of the endless piano literature, and with a slightly Slavic twist.

This episode begins with a triple comparative performance of the fiery Chopin Prelude in D minor played by Alfred Cortot, Shura Cherkassky, and Claudio Arrau. Each player is very different in detail.

A deeply nostalgic version of the andante movement from Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Op. 26 is played eloquently by Byron Janis. The very tricky Scherzo for Piano in A-flat major by Alexander Borodin brilliantly is rendered by Vladimir Ashkenazy. He gives another comparative performance of Frederic Chopin.

 

Playlist

Prelude for Piano, Op. 28: no 24 in D minor

Frédéric Chopin

Alfred Cortot

EMI

 

Prelude for Piano, Op. 28: no 24 in D minor

Frédéric Chopin

Shura Cherkassky

Philips

 

Prelude for Piano, Op. 28: no 24 in D minor

Frédéric Chopin

Claudio Arrau

Philips

 

Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Op. 26; Andante

Sergei Rachmaninov

Byron Janis; Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra; Kirill Kondrashin

Philips

 

The Leprechaun's Dance No. 3 from Stanford - Four Irish Dances, arr. Grainger

Percy Grainger

Percy Grainger

Nimbus Records

 

Scherzo for Piano in A flat major

Alexander Borodin

Vladimir Ashkenazy

Philips

 

Sonata No. 3 in A minor, Op. 28

Sergei Prokofiev

Emil Gilels

Philips

 

Impromptu No. 1 in A flat major, Op. 29

Frédéric Chopin

Artur Rubinstein

Philips

 

Impromptu No. 1 in A flat major, Op. 29

Frédéric Chopin

Alfred Cortot

EMI

 

Piano Sonata No. 1 in C minor, Op. 4; Larghetto

Frédéric Chopin

Nikita Magaloff

Philips

 

Etude Op. 42, No. 4 in F sharp

Alexander Scriabin

Sviatoslav Richter

Philips

 

Suite No. 1 for Two Pianos in G minor, Op. 5; Tears

Sergei Rachmaninov

Lyubov Bruk & Mark Taimanov

Philips

 

Sentimental Melody

Aaron Copland

Giacomo Franci

Fonè di giulio cesare ricci