Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier

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Saturday, February 22, 2014

Martina Serafin as the Marschallin and Alice Coote as Octavian in Strauss's 'Der Rosenkavalier.' Martina Serafin as the Marschallin and Alice Coote as Octavian in Strauss's "Der Rosenkavalier." (Photo: Jonathan Tichler/Metropolitan Opera)

This Saturday at 1pm, the Met broadcast it's Der Rosenkavalier, with soprano Martina Serafin as the lovely Marschallin and mezzo Alice Coote as her lover Octavian.  

Nathaniel Merrill’s Der Rosenkavalier premiered in 1969 and is one of the Met's longest-running productions. Over the years it has managed to stay fresh with the help of talented singers, who bring to life the music and the romance. In this performance conductor Edward Gardner leads a bright cast through an opera about love, lust, and new beginnings. In addition to Alice Coote and Martina Serafin, the cast includes Peter Rose as Baron Ochs and Erin Morley as the young, beautiful Sophie. 

Cast:

Conductor: Edward Gardner 
Feldmarschallin: Martina Serafin (soprano)
Octavian: Alice Coote (Mezzo-soprano) 
Sophie: Erin Morley (soprano)
Baron Ochs: Peter Rose (bass)

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Comments [9]

mrs. Newman

Is Mr. Lane the only person to hear this pre-recorded broadcast?

Feb. 24 2014 06:51 PM

Um, you're talking to yourself.

I am not an echt heldentenor.

Feb. 22 2014 05:42 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

THE broadcast has just ended with Martina Serafin as the Marshallin, Alice Coote as Octavian and Erin Morley as Sophie singing the ever-entrancing trio and the young lovers' duets with consummate beauty and musicality. KUDOSTO ALL CONCERNED INCLUDING THE MAESTRO AND THE ONE AND ONLY MET OPERA ORCHESTRA !!!

Feb. 22 2014 05:10 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

I meant to list also the roles of Rienzi and Lohengrin.

Feb. 22 2014 04:39 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

A delightful romp of a performance dating back to November 22nd, 2013. Peter Rose as Baron Ochs has fun with the role and besides the proper dark bass timbre he has a good low E to close the second act. I am a Wagnerian romantischer heldentenor. I will sing the four song cycles that are most often performed in their orchestral garb:the complete Wagner's "Wesendonck Lieder," the complete Mahler's "Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen," the tenor's music in Mahler's "Das Lied von der Erde" and Waldemar's music in Schoenberg's "Gurre-Lieder" at the New Life Expo at the Hotel Pennsylvania in NYC on Saturday March 22nd at 6 PM in the Gold Room on the second floor. I have sung four three-hour-long solo concerts, the last two ALL-WAGNER concerts, in the Isaac Stern Auditorium of Carnegie Hall including programming the Wagner and the first named Mahler song cycle. One may hear my singing LIVE from the main hall, the Isaac Stern Auditorium of CARNEGIE HALL, from my four three-hour-long solo concerts by downloading, FREE, 37 out of the nearly 100 selections that I have sung there by going to RECORDED SELECTIONS on my websites www.WagnerOpera.com, www.ShakespeareOpera.com and www.RichardWagnerMusicDramaInstitute.com Roles represented from live performances are Otello, Siegfried, Goetterdaemmerung Siegfried, Florestan, Tristan, Parsifal, Siegmund, Walther von Stolzing, Orfeo, Federico and, in oratorio, Judas Maccabaeus.

Feb. 22 2014 04:21 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

Maestro EDWARD GARDNER conducts with the "echt" Viennese romantic era stylistic spirit and infectious gayety redolent in the era Strauss sought successfully to present to his own era removed forward by some 60 years or so.
The male singers seemed to characterize as much as sing, except for the Italian Singer, of course.

Feb. 22 2014 03:28 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

Eric Cutler as the Italian Singer acquitted himself well, but to anyone who had heard Kurt Baum steal the show at performances of the opera at the MET with all star casts including Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and Rise Stevens will surely admit that the Di rigori aria IS a show-stopper given the right singer.

Feb. 22 2014 02:15 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

Two of my voice teachers MET OPERA singers Friedrich Schorr who sang Faninal and Alexander Kipnis who sang Baron Ochs at the MET OPERA with perhaps the greatest of all Marshallins, Lote Lehmann, counted this opera as one of their favorites for its story line, its music and the way it remains linearly a single theme holding well together without undue complications. The combination of those legendary superstars, who specialized as Wagnerians, made for history at the old MET

Feb. 22 2014 12:55 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

FRIEDA HEMPEL, the original Marshallin at the premieres of Der Rosenkavalier at the Berlin Opera and MET OPERA performances, chosen by Richard Strauss himself, had the voice, musicianship and acting prowess, plus a joie de vivre personality that gave credibility to her presentation. Frieda prepared me for my Ten Language Solo Debut concert in the main hall of Carnegie Hall. I am Wagnerian heldentenor. The first half of that concert, live, can be downloaded, free, at my website www.WagnerOpera.com

Feb. 22 2014 12:05 PM

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