Your Perfect Weekend: June 15-17

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

WQXR

This weekend's picks include Leonidas Kavakos with the Philharmonic, a Debussy-themed concert combining solo piano with Japanese koto, the Bang on a Can Marathon, and a tribute to John Cage.

Friday, June 15 at 2 pm
New York Philharmonic
Leonidas Kavakos, violin
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Korngold's Violin Concerto was premiered by Jascha Heifetz in 1947. Korngold chose St. Louis for the premiere to avoid the "snobbish, atonal anger" of the New York critics. Indeed, St. Louis critics praised it, whereas one New York critic wrote after the New York premiere that the piece was "more corn than gold." Since then, however, the piece has become a favorite among audiences everywhere for its brilliant solo passages, majestic harmonies and beautiful melodies, several of which were borrowed from some of Korngold's most famous film scores. Also on this  program are Beethoven's Coriolan Overture and Nielsen's Symphony No. 3, Sinfonia espansiva. Performances of this concert will also take place Thursday, June 14 at 7:30 pm and on Saturday, June 16 at 8 pm.

 

Saturday, June 16 at 7:30 pm
Debussy II: Sketches, Prints and Screens
Dillon Gallery
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The visual arts, especially Japanese prints, had an enormous impact on Debussy's music. In collaboration with the Dillon Gallery's exhibit "From Edo to Video" on the history of Japanese Screens, the Chelsea Music Festival presents a program of French and Japanese art songs, solo piano works, and traditional and newly-composed pieces for the koto. Arrive at 6:30 to hear a pre-concert talk entitled "The Great Wave, Silence & Song," with several smart folks including resident visual artist Makoto Fujimura, composer-in-residence Somei Satoh and French cellist Marc Coppey about how various art forms portray the forces of nature in different ways.

 

Sunday, June 17, 12 noon to midnight
Bang on a Can Marathon
World Financial Center Winter Garden
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Since its first marathon concert on Mother's Day in 1987, Bang on a Can has been providing a kind of big-box store for experimental music from not only downtown New York but internationally. This Father's Day, the organization looks back on its 25 years with twelve back-to-back hours of new music, with artists such as Vijay Iyer, Todd Reynolds and the Bang on a Can All-Stars performing works by Julia Wolfe (one of the three co-founders), Oscar Bettison, Steve Reich, and many more. Admission to the marathon is free.

Sunday, June 17 at 7:30 pm
Open Cage: NEW YORK – Celebrating John Cage at 100
Eyebeam Art+Technology Center
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This 100-minute performative work honoring John Cage at the centennial of his birth will include recorded and live music, collected stories written by Cage, a film of him discussing his work, and more. Presented by the Chelsea Music Festival, the work will be performed by the festival's musicians, as well as by members of the New York music and art communities and Cage enthusiasts. Interested audience members will also be invited to take part in the performance, and simultaneous activities will be taking place in and around an installation of cages with their doors open in a tribute to Cage and his work.

A picnic and the New York Philharmonic in Central Park. A chance encounter with a string quartet on the High Line. A roadtrip to Tanglewood. We want to hear about and see all your favorite summer music experiences. Tag your Tweets and Instagram photos with #WQXRsummer and also add to our Flickr pool. We'll share your photos throughout the summer.

 

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Comments [1]

Kenneth from Brooklyn

Well, once again WQXR gets it wrong. The Korngold Concerto was <b>based</b> on his film scores from the 1930's, not the other way around.

Jun. 14 2012 01:05 AM

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