Best of Carnegie Hall Live: Cleveland, Berlin and Budapest

WQXR highlights great moments from the Carnegie Hall Live series, co-produced with Carnegie Hall and American Public Media

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Sunday, September 09, 2012

Conductor Franz Welser-Most and the Cleveland Orchestra. (Melanie Burford for NPR)

During most of the year, New York City is so busy with performances that classical music lovers can easily be reduced to the same state as a three-year-old who is offered chicken nuggets or mac-and-cheese or a peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwich or pizza: We burst into tears because there are too many choices!

But if there’s one time of year when that’s not the case, it might be the first few weeks of September; everyone’s back from vacation, but the fall performance season hasn’t quite started up yet.

To fill the void, WQXR is reprising some choice in-concert moments we brought you via our new series Carnegie Hall Live, co-produced with Carnegie Hall and American Public Media.

You’ll hear symphonies, concertos, piano recitals, song, and chamber music on our four-program series, Carnegie Hall Live: The Best of Season One, broadcast Sundays at 9 pm through the end of September.

Program details:

Shostakovich: Symphony No. 6 - Cleveland Orchestra; Franz Welser-Möst, conductor

Mahler: Totenfeier, from Symphony No. 2 - Berlin Philharmonic; Sir Simon Rattle, conductor

Schubert: Symphony No. 9 - Budapest Festival Orchestra; Ivan Fischer, conductor - Listen: Full Concert

The WQXR e-newsletter. Show highlights, links to music news, on-demand concerts, events from The Greene Space and more.

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