Philadelphia Orchestra Performs Shostakovich & Ravel

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Thursday, January 17, 2013

Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra at Carnegie Hall in January 2013 (NPR Music)

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, in his first year as music director, brings the Philadelphia Orchestra to Carnegie Hall for a dramatic program featuring Ravel’s La Valse and Shostakovich's burning Symphony No. 5.

Leonidas Kavakos, known as a "musician's musician" in classical music circles, is the soloist in Szymanowski's Violin Concerto No. 2. Kavakos has been a regular guest in Philadelphia since making his debut with the orchestra in 1999. He takes on a work characterized by its Polish folk influences and lush Romantic strains.

Below: a capsule history of the Philadelphia Orchestra at Carnegie Hall:

Program Details:

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Music Director
Leonidas Kavakos, Violin

Ravel: La valse
Szymanowski: Violin Concerto No. 2
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5

Below is the archive of our live chat and Twitter conversation.

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Comments [9]

WQXR

@Frank - we apologize for the technological glitch in our streaming. The stream is now playing in 128K stereo. Thanks for your interest.

Jan. 24 2013 12:16 PM
Frank from Essen, Germany

I am an enthusiastc follower of WQXR's Carnegie Hall live broadcasts and especially thankful for the archived versions of some of the concerts accessible via audio stream.
So here's my problem: is it possible that the audio stream above is in mono and not in stereo? It certainly sounds like mono on my system and therefore doesn't full justice to the glorious sound of the Philadelphia Orchestra - which is my absolute favorite orchestra in the world!

Jan. 24 2013 06:30 AM
Barbara Cantalupo from Bethlehem

This was a transcendent experience hearing Yannick's Shoshtakovich's Symphony No. 5--it's what life is worth living for...

Jan. 19 2013 09:10 AM
Les from Miami, Florida

A rebirth of commitment and a continuation of the majesty and excellence of the Philadelphia Orchestra under Ne'zet-Se'guin informed what I heard tonight via the WQXR Internet broadcast from Carnegie Hall. "La Valse" revealed itself again in details of scoring not often prominently heard. Here, as in the Shostakovich Fifth Symphony at every printed indication, great attention was paid to dynamics. If "pianissimo" was written in the score, that, inded, what was heard. I must say, I was very impressed by this. Moreover, I'd have to say aprops this, an earlier generation maestro, Fritz Reiner, seemed to be so careful in his insistence upon written dynamics being heard as written (at least judging by recordings). The solos and ensemble tuttis were a delight. The Szmanowski Violin Concerto No. 2 I heard for the first time; and, though I like it enough to want to hear it again, I'm not informed enough to comment on it. The one tendency that Ne'zet-Se'guin displayed that I found attention-getting was one of elongating the conclusion of a phrase, much like Maestro Maazel feels is justified. All told, I'm glad to have heard this thoughtfully-programmed concert and expect further delights from The Philadelphia Orchestra and Maestro Yannick Ne'zet-Se'guin.

Jan. 17 2013 10:34 PM
Chris from Denver

There is a certain depth of richness the Philadelphia Orchestra always has......amazing group.

Jan. 17 2013 09:43 PM
Antonio

What a speech about politic!!!
Shostakovich 5th symphony is a masterwork, full stop.

Jan. 17 2013 09:14 PM
Michael Druck from Chanhassen ,MN

" An Outdoor Overture" was composed by Aaron Copland in 1938 for " The High School of Music and Art" in New York City.

Jan. 17 2013 05:23 PM
Michael Druck from Chanhassen ,MN

It is Copland/ An e is not needed

Jan. 17 2013 05:12 PM
marvin kalisch from dobbs ferry,NY

Aaron Copeland's outdoor overture was composed for the high school of music and arts,not the high school of performing arts,as stated by Jeff Spurgeon.

Jan. 17 2013 08:24 AM

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