Transcendent Music with Paul Lansky

Mixtapes Streams Wednesdays at 3 pm on Q2 Music

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Wednesday, December 19, 2012

In addition to his landmark work in computer music, the composer Paul Lansky has worked with So Percussion, David Starobin and the Brentano String Quartet.

Best known for his pioneering work with sampling and algorithmic composition, Lansky became known to an even wider audience after Radiohead used a clip of his tape piece Mild und Leise in the band's song Idioteque. In 2002, the current Princeton professor and composer-in-residence for the Alabama Symphony was awarded with a lifetime achievement award by SEAMUS (the Society for Electroacoustic Music in the United States).

"Transcendent Music" by Paul Lansky

Gyorgi LigetiCordes a Vide: Ligeti's late piano music has rejuvenated the instrument and is inspirationaL for us all.  In this etude a simple harmonic idea leads to stunningly rich and unique harmonies

Steven MackeyBeautiful Passing: Mackey's violin concerto was inspired by the experience of sitting with his mother while she died.  She wanted him to tell people that she had a "beautiful passing.  It's a wonderful work, deeply moving and uplifting.

Gyorgi Ligeti: Arc en Ciel: Another breathtaking étude, full of ecstatic harmonies

Louis AndriessenHadewijch: A setting of medieval religious love poetry, the piece takes us on an inspiring journey as the protagonist slowly makes her way up the aisle of a cathedral, starting with the rat-infested street and culminating in religious ecstasy at the altar.

Playlist

Gyorgi LigetiCordes a Vide (Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano)
Steven Mackey
Beautiful Passing, (Leila Josefowitz,  violin; Los Angeles Philharmonic; Gustavo Dudamel, conductor)
Gyorgi LigetiArc en Ciel (Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano)
Louis AndriessenHadewijch (Susan Narucki, soprano; ASKO Ensemble; Reinbert de Leeuw, conductor)

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