BBC Proms: Brahms's A German Requiem

Saturday, August 31, 2013

WQXR

On Saturday, Aug. 31 at 5 pm, WQXR broadcasts the seventh in a series of performances from the BBC Proms festival in London.

American conductor Marin Alsop, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, and an 80-strong chorus explores Brahms’s 1868 masterpiece in the context of his relationship with Robert Schumann and Schumann’s widow, Clara. Sacred but non-liturgical, A German Requiem is one of the most powerful works for choir and orchestra. Schumann’s Fourth Symphony and Brahms’s Tragic Overture act as preludes to a work of great seriousness.

Program Details:

Brahms: Tragic Overture
Schumann: Symphony No. 4 in D minor

INTERVAL

Brahms: A German Requiem

Rachel Harnisch, soprano
Henk Neven, baritone
Choir of the Enlightenment
Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment
Marin Alsop, conductor

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Comments [2]

Cat D'Arcy from Minot, ND

Marin Alsop and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment are a great revelation! Brava!!!

Aug. 31 2013 06:50 PM
Silversalty from Brooklyn

Sorry, spelling check.

The carousel had [has] Brahm without the "s" at the end.

This post has "Brahms's," which depending on the web source may or may not be correct.

According to the below listed site, how the possessive apostrophe should be applied depends on how the word is pronounced.

http://www.informatics.sussex.ac.uk/department/docs/punctuation/node22.html#SECTION00063000000000000000

That is, usually for a singular the word is tagged with an ['s].

For plurals ending in "s" the word is tagged only with ['].

But the confusing part is when the word is a name ending in "s" but the usual pronunciation of the possessive doesn't include the doubled "esses" sound.

An example given is "Saint Saens' music," which doesn't seem fair since it ain't even English to start with.

Another example provided is "Ulysses' companions."

But a prior example has "James's fiancée."

I could say "James's" either with or without the doubled "ziziz" sound though usually without, making the ['s] ending wrong.

Personally I don't say "Brahmziz" for his possessive.

But then it's English with its strange rules.

Now regarding how "pianist" should be spoken ..

Aug. 31 2013 11:51 AM

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