Flight of the Bumblebee Played in Record Time

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

A violinist from East London has made his way into the Guinness Book of Records for the fastest performance of Flight of the Bumblebee.

Oliver Lewis, 39, set the world record for his rendition of the Rimsky-Korsakov piece live on the BBC children's program Blue Peter. An observer from the Guinness Book witnessed the attempt and confirmed that his time of one minute 3.356 seconds shaved nearly a second off the previous record.

According to his MySpace page, Lewis studied violin at the Purcell School of Music and the Guildhall School of Music in England and has since been the concertmaster of the Heidelberg Chamber Orchestra. He’s performed in several hit shows including: Oliver!, War of the Worlds, and Spirit of the Dance.

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Comments [4]

kenneth Bennett Lane from Lake Hiawatha, NJ

Some people might still remember the radio program, "The Green Hornet" in which Rimsky-Korsakoff's "Flight of the Bumblebee" was supposed to be scary. Time has passed and yesterday's scary is today's bogey man, not very
frightening. Now, today, we have HALLOWEEN, what could be a better time to hear music which extols the scary. Moussorgsky's "Night on Bald Mountain," Grieg's "In the Hall of the Mountain King," Sibelius' "Valse Triste," Verdi's Requiem's "Dies Irae." Schubert's "Erlkoenig," Johann Sebastian Bach's "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor," Gilbert & Sullivan's "Ruddigore's" "When the Night Wind Howls," Igor Stravinsky's "Firebird," Victor Herbert's "March of the Wooden Soldiers," Tschaikovsky's "Swan Lake," Wagner's " "Vorspiel" to Act 3 of "Siegfried," the Execution Scene from Verdi's "Don Carlos," the Wolf's theme from Prokofieff's "Peter and the Wolf," John Williams' Shark's Music from the film "Jaws," the skiing scene from the film "Snowbound," Bernard Hermann's chilling shower scene knifing in the film "Psycho," Dukas' "Sorcerer's Apprentice" and Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana" are some of the more familiar chestnuts, but there are many more musical examples.

Nov. 01 2010 11:37 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane from Lake Hiawatha, NJ

Some people might still remember the radio program, "The Green Hornet" in which Rimsky-Korsakoff's "Flight of the Bumblebee" was supposed to be scary. Time has passed and yesterday's scary is today's bogey man, not very frightening. Now, today, we have HALLOWEEN, what could be a better time to hear music which extols the scary. Moussorgsky's "Night on Bald Mountain," Grieg's "In the Hall of the Mountain King,"
Sibelius' "Valse Trist," Verdi's Requiem's "Dies Irae." Schubert's "Erlkoenig,"Johann Sebastian Bach's "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor," Gilbert & Sullivan's "Ruddigore's" "When the Night Wind Howls," Igor Stravinsky's "Firebird," Victor Herbert's "March of the Wooden Soldiers," Tschaikovsky's "Swan Lake," Wagner's " "Voirspiel" to Act 3 of "Siegfried" and Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana" are some of the more familiar chestnuts, but there are many more musical examples.

Oct. 31 2010 12:40 PM
Native Brooklynite

My response to "the fastest?" So What!! The problem is people equate quality with fast and loud. Let this guy play something slow with feeling, and we'll see whether he has any musicianship.

Oct. 19 2010 08:42 PM
Silversalty from Brooklyn

This reminds me of the Internet sensation from a few years ago that generated a world wide search for the originally anonymous performer. The NYTimes even had a few stories on it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjA5faZF1A8

Note the view count for the video.

Web Guitar Wizard Revealed at Last -
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/27/arts/television/27heff.html

Oct. 19 2010 11:07 AM

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